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McKay, Claude, 1890-1948

 Person

Dates

  • Existence: 1889-09-15 - 1948-05-22

Claude McKay was a Jamaican-born writer who spent most of his adult life in the United States, Europe and North Africa. He wrote several collections of poetry, novels, short stories, non-fiction and two autobiographical books. He is best known for an early poem, "If We Must Die" (1919), and his first novel, Home to Harlem (1928). He lived in the United States, primarily in New York, from 1913-1919, and then spent most of the next 15 years in England, Russia, France, Spain and Morocco before returning to New York in 1934. He contributed to many liberal and socialist journals, including Sylvia Pankhurst's Worker's Dreadnaught and Max Eastman's The Liberator, and he is commonly identified among the major writers of the Harlem Renaissance. He converted to Catholicism in 1944 and died in Chicago in 1948. See the standard biographical print resources for additional information.

Found in 1 Collection or Record:

Photographs of prominent African Americans

 Collection
Call Number: JWJ MSS 76
Overview: Photographs drawn from various collections in the James Weldon Johnson Collection. The collection includes predominantly images of prominent African American writers, cultural leaders, and entertainers, as well as photographs by important African American photographers. A small number of images document people and places outside the United States. The collection forms a visual record of artists, writers, actors, musicians, and politicians active chiefly in the United States from the 1920s...
Dates: 1875-1978