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Yale Child Study Center reference collection

 Collection
Call Number: Pam Coll 11

Content Description

The collection consists of short published works on topics related to child welfare used by Arnold Gesell and the staff of the Yale Child Study Center as a reference collection. Topics include children and the war, day care centers (day nurseries), education, infant mortality, juvenile delinquency, intellectual disability (mental deficiency), mental health (mental hygiene), mental illness (insanity), nurseries, and nutrition. Collection materials are primarily from American publications, but include items from Canada, Australia, and several European countries. The collection includes pamphlets, reprints, newsletters, newspaper clippings, and reports published between 1886 and 1958, with the bulk of materials published between 1910 and 1950. Many items in the collection are stamped with Arnold Gessell's name and have notations indicating the source of materials or filing instructions. Some items contain enclosures from individuals or publications, and a few items include correspondence or ephemera. Multiple publications in the collection were authored by Arnold Gesell and Yale School of Medicine faculty and staff.

Materials in the collection are arranged as they were received from the Child Study Center, with the exception of materials relevant to New Haven and Connecticut, which have been organized as Series XI. Topical series titles have been updated to reflect current Library of Congress subject terms. Original titles have been maintained in parentheses, some of which are now considered offensive terms. Additional items on topics from Series I-XIV may be found in Series XV.

Dates

  • 1886 - 1958

Creator

Language of Materials

Materials in the collection are primarily in English, with a small number of publications in German, French, Italian, Russian, and Norwegian.

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright status for collection materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Transferred from the Yale Child Study Center, December 2014.

Arrangement

Materials in the collection are arranged in 15 series: Series I. Child development, 1927-1947. Series II. Child welfare, 1914-1945. Series III. Children and the war, 1941-1943. Series IV. Day care centers, 1933-1943. Series V. Education, 1892-1945. Series VI. Infant mortality, 1913-1936. Series VII. Intellectual disability (feeblemindedness), 1886-1938. VIII. Juvenile delinquency, 1911-1944. IX. Mental health (mental hygiene), 1916-1936. X. Mental illness (insanity), 1904-1947. XI. New Haven and Connecticut organizations, 1922-1949. XII. Nursery schools, 1932-1943. XIII. Nutrition, 1909-1947. XIV. Iowa State University Child Welfare Bulletins, 1931-1938. Series XV. A-Z, 1900-1958. Materials in the collection are further arranged by author last name, then by date of publication. Materials with unknown authors and some full issues of publications are arranged alphabetically by title.

Related Materials

Related materials include Arnold Gesell and Colleagues Publications Collection (Ms Coll 41); Child Study Center, School of Medicine, Yale University, Records (RU 910); Arnold L. Gesell, Director of the Clinic of Child Development, School of Medicine, Yale University, Case Study Records (RU 783); Child Study Center, School of Medicine, Yale University, Records Concerning the Longitudinal Study (RU 282).

Extent

44.25 Linear Feet (105 boxes)

Persistent URL

https://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/med.pam.0011

Overview

The collection consists of approximately 3,800 short published works on topics related to child welfare used by Arnold Gesell and the staff of the Yale Child Study Center as a reference collection. Topics include children and the war, day care centers (day nurseries), education, infant mortality, juvenile delinquency, intellectual disability (mental deficiency), mental health (mental hygiene), mental illness (insanity), nurseries, and nutrition. A portion of collection materials document organizations and conditions relevant to child welfare in New Haven and Connecticut. Materials in the collection include pamphlets, reprints, newsletters, newspaper clippings, and reports published between 1886 and 1958, with the bulk of materials published between 1910 and 1950. Multiple publications in the collection were authored by Arnold Gesell and Yale School of Medicine faculty and staff.

Biographical / Historical

The Yale Child Study Center is a department of the Yale School of Medicine dedicated to improving the mental health of children and families, advancing understanding of their psychological and developmental needs, and treating and preventing childhood mental illness through the integration of research, clinical practice, and professional training. The center serves as the Department of Child Psychiatry for the Yale School of Medicine and Yale New Haven Hospital; is a center for basic neurodevelopment research on the earliest neurodevelopment and behavioral problems troubling children; and provides services in clinics, community settings, homes, and pediatric practices. The center’s faculty are engaged in domestic and international policy making; provide trainings in child psychiatry, social work, child psychology, research, specific intervention and prevention approaches, and in special areas of children’s mental health; and are engaged in research on the genetic and neurobiological basis of childhood psychiatric disorders.

The Yale Child Study Center was founded in 1911 by Arnold Gesell. At that time Gesell had completed a PhD in psychology and was working towards an MD at the Yale School of Medicine, which he completed in 1915. Gesell obtained the use of a room in the New Haven Dispensary to continue his previous work with children with disabilities and created the Yale Clinic of Child Development. Gesell became known for his studies of child development at the clinic. Using one-way mirrors to photograph and film researchers interacting with children, he documented developmental milestones for children from infancy through adolescence. Gesell was a prodigious writer, publishing numerous articles and more than a dozen books about his findings for the scientific community and the general public. His most famous work, An Atlas of Infant Behavior, contains 3,200 photographs captured from sessions at the clinic. Dr. Gesell was the director of the clinic until his retirement in 1948.

The second director of the Yale Clinic of Child Development was Milton J. E. Senn, a pediatrician with psychoanalytic training, who also served as Chairman of Yale’s Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Senn changed the clinic’s name to the Yale Child Study Center to reflect a more comprehensive mission and engaged faculty from the pediatrics and psychiatry departments in the center's activities. Dr. Senn’s work included numerous clinical and research collaborations with the pediatrics department and a major longitudinal study of infants. Dr. Senn served as director until his retirement in 1966.

Albert J. Solnit, a pediatrician, psychoanalyst, and social activist became the third director of the Yale Child Study Center in 1966. Dr. Solnit had been the Center’s first resident in child psychiatry. During his tenure, the center continued to collaborate with pediatrics; conducted developmental research with children in orphanages, in foster care, or who had been abused; and began consulting work with juvenile courts and local, state, and federal policy makers. Dr. Solnit also hired Donald J. Cohen, a child psychiatrist who was a researcher on brain neurotransmitters, thus expanding the center’s purview to include biomedical research.

Upon Dr. Solnit's retirement in 1983, Donald J. Cohen became the fourth Director of the Yale Child Study Center. Under his leadership, Dr. Cohen facilitated a large increase in federal grant funding for work on neurochemistry, molecular and population genetics, and neuroimaging. He also expanded the center’s scope to include international collaboration on advocacy for research and clinical services for children.
Title
Yale Child Study Center Reference Collection
Status
Completed
Author
Katherine Isham
Date
2021
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Medical Historical Library, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Repository

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