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James Fenimore Cooper Collection

 Collection
Call Number: YCAL MSS 415

Scope and Contents

The James Fenimore Cooper Collection provides evidence of the personal and professional life of James Fenimore Cooper, and to a lesser degree, the Cooper family, between 1792 and 1976. The papers chronicle Cooper’s writing career, involvement in the navy, and travels through Europe, and consist of correspondence, writings, personal papers, legal and financial documents, clippings, artwork, and objects. As an author who was engaged in the process of printing and publishing his works, as well as in establishing and protecting his own copyright, Cooper’s papers shed light on book production during the mid-nineteenth century.

James Fenimore Cooper’s creative process can be traced in the collection, which contains documents from various stages in producing a work, ranging from notebooks and research material to handwritten drafts, proofs, printed versions, and reviews. Cooper gained a reputation during his lifetime, and evidence of his fame can be found in correspondents requesting his autograph, letters inviting him to lecture, various articles about him and his home, Otsego Hall, engraved portraits, and correspondence with Horatio Greenough, who sculpted a bust of Cooper (an image of which can be found in the Art Series). However, Cooper’s fame also impacted the preservation of his literary manuscripts, pages of which were often dispersed to various collectors and autograph seekers; for this reason many of his drafts have missing sections. Material objects reflecting Cooper’s profession as a writer, such as his travel desk and desk set, are also part of the collection.

James Fenimore Cooper was keenly aware and protective of his legal rights. His interest in copyright is evident in his correspondence with his printers and publishers, such as his care in establishing copyright in the U.S. and England and his concern when pirated works appeared of his novels. He kept detailed notes about copyright ownership found in his "Copy Right Book” (1842) and was in possession of a pamphlet on "An Act to Amend the Laws Relating to Dramatic Literary Property" (1833). Cooper also held the copyright for Susan Fenimore Cooper’s publication Rural Hours, and his family filed for copyright ownership of a number of Cooper’s works following his death. In many ways Cooper’s interest in copyright reflects the financial realities of his career as an author, as can be traced in various financial documents in the collection.

Between 1839 and 1845 Cooper was also involved in a number of legal proceedings, most notably libel cases filed against publishers, such as Park Benjamin (The New World), Horace Greeley and Thomas McElrath (New York Tribune), William L. Stone (Commercial Advertiser), Thurlow Weed (Evening Journal), and James Watson Webb (Courier and Enquirer). As various clippings in the collection indicate, these cases received extensive press coverage.

Cooper's career in the navy is evidenced by warrants appointing Cooper midshipman, paymaster, and quartermaster. As an author he maintained an interest in maritime topics, which can be seen in his work to write The History of the Navy of the United States of America, seafaring-themed novels such as The Pilot and The Water Witch, and several articles for The Naval Magazine. He also corresponded with a number of naval officers such as William Branford Shubrick and Charles Wilkes, as well as Ned Myers (who inspired Ned Myers: A Life Before the Mast). After leaving the navy Cooper was briefly involved in whaling, which is chronicled in his correspondence with partner Charles T. Dering and an account book for the whaling vessel Union.

Cooper served as the American consul in Lyons, France, and lived in Europe for seven years. A letter appointing Cooper to this position, signed by John Quincy Adams, is included in the collection, along with other items relating to the family’s move to Europe, such as visas, travel documents, a passport, and calling cards. This period is also reflected in Cooper’s correspondence with the Marquis de Lafayette and William Cabell Rives. While living in Europe, Cooper fostered relationships with publishers, such as Charles Gosselin in France and Duncker & Humblot in Germany, who published translations of his novels.

Cooper’s family life can be traced in his correspondence with his wife and children, as well as with extended family members. In addition, the family’s everyday life can be glimpsed through their financial records, documenting the purchase of household items. In his diaries, which largely date from 1832 to 1835 in the collection, Cooper discusses his activities and opinions, including his experience of reading various chapters in the Bible. Because the Coopers, and their relatives the De Lanceys, Phinneys, and Pomeroys, were prominent American families, the collection is a window into social and political life during the nineteenth century. Cooper’s correspondents include Daniel D. Barnard, Charles Jared Ingersoll, Joseph Reed Ingersoll, and John Jay (and his sons Peter A. and William), and Samuel F. B. Morse.

Dates

  • 1792 - 1976
  • Majority of material found within 1792 - 1894

Creator

Language of Materials

Chiefly in English; some materials are in French.

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.

Existence and Location of Copies

A portion of this collection is available on microfilm as identified on individual folders.

Conditions Governing Use

The James Fenimore Cooper Collection is the physical property of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, consult the appropriate curator.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of James Fenimore Cooper, Henry S. Fenimore Cooper, and Linn Fenimore Cooper, 1931-1965.

Other material came to the library in small quantities from various sources as indicated on individual folders.

Arrangement

Organized into four series: I. Correspondence, 1813-1894; II. Writings, 1824-1976; III. Personal Papers, 1792-1975; and IV. Art and Objects, 1830-1854.

Extent

18.57 Linear Feet ((37 boxes) + 20 broadside folders, 5 art objects)

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.cooper

Overview

The collection provides evidence of the personal and professional life of James Fenimore Cooper, and to a lesser degree, the Cooper family, between 1792 and 1976. The collection documents Cooper's writing career, service in the United States Navy, and travels through Europe, and consists of correspondence, writings, personal papers, legal and financial documents, clippings, artwork, and objects. As an author who was engaged in the process of printing and publishing his works, and who was deeply interested in copyright, Cooper's papers shed light on book production during the mid nineteenth-century.

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851)

James Fenimore Cooper, American novelist, was born on September 15, 1789, to William and Elizabeth Fenimore Cooper in Burlington, New Jersey. Cooper attended Yale College from 1803 to 1805, but was expelled before receiving a degree. In 1806 he worked on a merchant vessel, the Sterling, in order to acquire experience necessary before joining the navy in 1808. He served in several posts, including midshipman, paymaster, and quartermaster. Cooper resigned from the navy shortly after he married Susan Augusta De Lancey in 1811. During the first years of their marriage the couple lived in Westchester County, Cooperstown (founded by Cooper’s father), and New York City, and throughout this period Cooper was involved in a number of business ventures, including whaling. He published his first novel (Precaution) in 1820, which launched his career as an author of a number of novels, non-fiction, and travel books. Among Cooper’s best known works are his historical novels, such as The Last of the Mohicans, The Pioneers, The Prairie, and The Spy, and nautical novels including The Pilot and Homeward Bound. In 1826 Cooper moved to Europe, which inspired his trilogy of European novels as well as several non-fiction travel accounts. He returned to the U.S. in 1833, and after a period in New York City, moved to the Cooper family home, Otsego Hall, in Cooperstown where he died in 1851.

Susan Augusta De Lancey, the third child of John Peter and Elizabeth Floyd De Lancey was born on January 28, 1792 in Mamaroneck, New York. Her siblings were Thomas James, Anne Charlotte, Caroline, and Edward. John Peter De Lancey was a former British army officer and the De Lanceys were a prominent New York family. Susan Cooper is credited with motivating her husband to become an author, by suggesting that he write a better novel when he criticized a book he was reading to her. At times she also acted as a proof reader for Cooper when he was unavailable to check page proofs. Susan De Lancey Cooper died in Cooperstown in 1852.

The Coopers had five children who lived into adulthood, their four daughters, Susan, Caroline, Anne, and Maria, and son, Paul. Susan Fenimore Cooper (1813-1894) served as her father’s copyist and eventually as his literary executor. She worked closely with him during the writing process, and evidence of her involvement is traced in forewords she wrote for Household editions of her father’s works (published between 1876 and 1884) as well as her articles "A Glance Backward" and “A Second Glance Backward” published in the Atlantic Monthly (1887). She also edited Papers and Pictures from the Writings of James Fenimore Cooper (1861). In turn, James Fenimore Cooper promoted his daughter's literary career; her books include: Elinor Wyllys; or, The Young Folk of Longbridge (1845), Rural Hours (1850), Rhyme and Reason of Country Life (1854), Rural Rambles (1854), and Mount Vernon: A Letter to the Children of America (1859).

Appendix A: Former Call Number Reference

The index below provides a cross reference from the catalogue card numbers, noted as —#, to the current location of the same material in the present arrangement.

1Box 14, folder 383
2Box 14, folder 384
3Box 14, folder 385-388
4Box 15, folder 389-390
5Box 19, folder 445
6Box 16, folder 391
8Box 17, folder 392
9Box 17, folder 399-407
10Box 17, folder 408
11Box 18, folder 409-410
12Box 18, folder 412
13Box 20, folders 446-447
14Box 18, folder 414
15Box 18, folder 428
16Box 18, folders 429-430
17Box 20, folder 449
18Box 18, folder 431
19Box 19, folder 433
20Box 19, folder 434
21Box 19, folder 435
22Box 19, folder 436
23Box 19, folders 441-442
24Box 26, folder 505
25Box 27, folder 514
26Box 23, folder 480
27Box 32, folder 481
28Box 23, folder 483
29Box 23, folder 484
30Box 23, folder 485
31Box 23, folders 482
32Box 17, folder 394
33Box 17, folder 395
34Box 1, folder 7
35Box 1, folders 14-21
36Box 1, folders 14-21
37Box 2, folder 43
38Box 2, folder 45
39Box 5, 127-128
40Box 5, 127-128
41Box 13, folder 371
42Box 11, folder 305
43Box 12, folder 324
44Box 13, folder 355
45Box 12, folders 327-333
46Box 3, folders 73-74
47Box 3, folder 75
48Box 3, folder 78
49Box 3, folder 80
50Box 4, folder 97
51Box 3, folder 109
52Box 2, folder 37
53Box 5, folder 123
54Box 5, folder 132
55Box 5, folder 146
57Box 7, folder 173
58Box 7, folder 199
59Box 7, folder 202
60Box 8, folder 214
61Box 8, folder 235
62Box 10, folder 283
63Box 20, folder 455
64Box 20, folder 451
65Box 20, folder 452
66Box 17, folder 397
67Box 20, folder 457
68Box 20, folder 456
69Box 27, folder 517
70Box 20, folder 459
71Box 20, folder 458
73Box 18, folder 413
76Box 17, folder 393
77Box 19, folder 444
78Box 24, folder 486
79Box 17, folder 397
80Box 27, folder 513
81Box 18, folder 412
82Box 17, folder 398
83Box 19, folder 443
84Box 24, folders 487-488
85Box 24, folder 489
86Box 24, folders 490-491
88Box 24, folder 492
89Box 24, folder 493
90Box 24, folder 494
91Box 24, folder 495
92Box 25, folders 496-499
93Box 25, folder 500
94Box 25, folder 501-502
95Box 25, folder 503
96Box 25, folder 504
97Box 26, folders 506-509
98Box 26, folder 510
99Box 1, folder 2
100Box 1, folder 3
105Box 1, folder 5
106Box 1, folder 6
106bBox 1, folder 7
107Box 1, folder 8
109Box 1, folder 9
110Box 1, folder 10
111Box 1, folder 11
112Box 1, folder 12
117Box 1, folders 14-21
118Box 1, folder 13
119Box 1, folder 22
124Box 1, folder 23
125Box 1, folder 24
127Box 1, folder 26
128Box 1, folder 27
129Box 5, folder 129
130Box 1, folder 28
131Box 1, folder 29
133Box 1, folder 30
135Box 1, folder 31
140Box 1, folder 32
144Box 2, folder 33
145Box 2, folder 33
146Box 2, folder 33
147Box 2, folder 33
148Box 2, folders 34-36
149Box 2, folders 34-36
150Box 2, folder 33
151Box 2, folder 33
152Box 2, folder 38
153Box 2, folder 39
154Box 2, folder 33
155Box 2, folder 40
156Box 2, folder 41
157Box 2, folder 42
158Box 2, folder 44
159Box 2, folder 45
160Box 2, folder 33
161Box 2, folder 33
162Box 2, folder 33
163Box 2, folder 46
164Box 2, folder 33
165Box 5, folders 127-128
166Box 5, folders 127-128
167Box 5, folders 127-128
168Box 2, folder 48
169Box 2, folder 49
170Box 2, folder 50
171Box 2, folder 33
172Box 2, folder 52
173Box 2, folder 33
174Box 2, folder 33
175Box 2, folder 54
180Box 3, folder 60
181Box 3, folder 61
182Box 3, folder 61
183Box 3, folder 63
184Box 3, folder 64
185Box 3, folder 65
186Box 3, folder 66
187Box 3, folder 67
188Box 2, folder 51
189Box 9, folder 249
190Box 2, folder 33
191Box 2, folder 33
192Box 2, folder 33
193Box 3, folder 68
194Box 2, folder 33
195Box 3, folder 69
196Box 2, folder 33
197Box 2, folder 33
198Box 2, folder 33
199Box 3, folder 70
200Box 3, folder 70
201Box 3, folder 70
202Box 3, folders 70-71
203Box 3, folder 70
204Box 3, folder 70
205Box 3, folder 72
206Box 3, folders 73-74
207Box 3, folder 76
208Box 3, folder 77
209Box 3, folder 79
210Box 3, folder 80
211Box 3, folder 81
212Box 3, folder 82
213Box 3, folder 83
214Box 3, folder 84
215Box 3, folder 70
216Box 3, folder 70
217Box 3, folder 70
218Box 3, folder 70
219Box 3, folder 85
220Box 3, folder 86
221Box 3, folder 70
222Box 3, folder 70
223Box 3, folder 70
224Box 3, folder 70
225Box 3, folder 70
226Box 3, folder 70
227Box 3, folder 70
228Box 3, folder 87
229Box 3, folder 88
230Box 4, folder 89
231Box 3, folder 70
232Box 3, folder 70
233Box 4, folder 92
234Box 4, folder 93
235Box 4, folders 94-95
236Box 4, folders 94-95
237Box 4, folders 94-95
242Box 4, folder 97
243Box 4, folder 97
244Box 4, folder 98
247Box 4, folder 99
249Box 4, folders 100-101
252Box 4, folder 102
255Box 3, folder 104
256Box 4, folder 105
257Box 4, folder 106
258 Box 4, folder 107
259Box 4, folder 108
260Box 4, folder 110
261Box 4, folder 107
262Box 4, folder 111
263Box 4, folder 112
264Box 5, folder 113
265 Box 4, folder 107
266Box 4, folder 107
267Box 4, folder 107
268Box 4, folder 107
269Box 4, folder 107
270Box 4, folder 107
271Box 5, folder 114
272Box 4, folder 107
273Box 4, folder 107
274Box 4, folder 107
275Box 5, folder 115
276Box 5 folder 116
277Box 4, folder 119
278Box 5, folders 117-118
279Box 5, folder 120
280Box 5, folder 121
281Box 5, folders 117-118
282Box 5, folder 122
283Box 5, folders 117-118
284Box 5, folder 123
285Box 5, folder 124
286Box 5, folder 126
287Box 5, folders 117-118
288Box 5, folders 117-118
289Box 5, folders 117-118
290Box 5, folder 126
291Box 5, folders 117-118
292Box 5, folders 117-118
293Box 5, folders 117-118
294Box 5, folders 117-118
295Box 5, folders 117-118
296Box 5, folders 117-118
297Box 5, folders 117-118
298Box 5, folders 117-118
299Box 5, folders 117-118
300Box 5, folders 117-118
302Box 5, folder 130
303Box 5, folders 117-118
304Box 5, folders 117-118
305Box 5, folders 117-118
306Box 5, folders 117-118
307Box 5, folders 117-118
308Box 5, folders 117-118
309Box 5, folders 117-118
310Box 5, folder 131
311Box 5, folders 117-118
312Box 5, folders 117-118
313Box 5, folder 133
314Box 5, folder 134
315Box 5, folder 135
316Box 5, folder 136
317Box 5, folder 137
318Box 5, folder 138
319Box 5, folder 139
320Box 5, folder 141
321Box 5, folder 142
322Box 5, folders 143-144
323Box 5, folder 145
324Box 5, folder 140
325Box 5, folder 140
326Box 5, folder 146
327Box 5, folder 140
328Box 5, folder 140
329Box 5, folder 140
330Box 5, folder 140
331Box 5, folder 148
332Box 6, folder 150
333Box 5, folder 149
334Box 5, folder 149
335Box 6, folder 151
336Box 5, folder 149
337Box 5, folder 149
338Box 5, folder 149
339Box 6, folder 153
340Box 6, folders 156-159
341Box 6, folder 154
342Box 6, folder 155
343Box 6, folders 156-159
344Box 6, folder 152
345Box 6, folder 152
346Box 6, folder 152
347Box 6, folder 152
348Box 6, folder 160
349Box 6, folder 152
350Box 6, folder 152
351Box 6, folder 152
352Box 6, folder 152
353Box 6, folder 152
354Box 6, folder 152
355Box 6, folder 152
356Box 6, folder 152
357Box 6, folder 152
358Box 6, folder 152
359Box 6, folder 152
360Box 6, folder 162
361Box 6, folder 152
362Box 6, folder 163
363Box 6, folder 152
364Box 8, folders 216-218
365Box 6, folder 152
366Box 6, folder 164
367Box 6, folder 165-167
369Box 6, folder 165-167
370Box 6, folder 165-167
371Box 6, folder 165-167
372Box 6, folder 165-167
373Box 6, folder 165-167
374Box 6, folder 168
375Box 6, folder 165-167
376Box 6, folder 165-167
377Box 6, folder 165-167
378Box 6, folder 165-167
379Box 6, folder 165-167
380Box 6, folder 165-167
381Box 6, folder 169
382Box 6, folder 165-167
383Box 6, folder 165-167
384Box 6, folder 170
385Box 6, folder 171
386Box 6, folder 165-167
387Box 6, folder 165-167
388Box 6, folder 165-167
391Box 7, folder 172
392Box 6, folder 165-167
393Box 6, folder 165-167
394Box 6, folder 165-167
395Box 5, folders 117-118
396Box 7, folder 173
397Box 6, folder 165-167
398Box 7, folder 174
399Box 6, folder 165-167
400Box 6, folder 165-167
401Box 7, folder 175
402Box 6, folder 165-167
403Box 7, folder 176
404Box 6, folder 165-167
405Box 7, folder 177
407Box 6, folder 165-167
408Box 7, folder 178
409Box 7, folder 179
410Box 7, folder 180
411Box 7, folder 180
412Box 7, folder 180
413Box 7, folder 180
414Box 7, folder 180
415Box 7, folder 180
416Box 7, folder 181
417Box 7, folder 180
418Box 7, folder 183
419Box 7, folder 182
420Box 7, folders 184-186
421Box 7, folder 421
422Box 7, folder 188
423Box 7, folder 190
423aBox 7, folder 189
424Box 7, folder 182
425Box 7, folder 191
426Box 7, folder 182
427Box 7, folder 182
428Box 7, folders 192-193
429Box 7, folder 194
430Box 7, folders 192-193
431Box 7, folders 192-193
432Box 7, folders 192-193
433Box 7, folders 192-193
433bBox 7, folders 192-193
434Box 7, folders 192-193
435Box 7, folders 192-193
436Box 7, folder 195
437Box 7, folders 192-193
438Box 7, folders 192-193
439Box 7, folders 192-193
440Box 7, folder 196
441Box 7, folder 197
442Box 7, folder 198
443Box 7, folders 192-193
444Box 7, folders 192-193
445Box 7, folders 192-193
446Box 7, folder 199
447Box 7, folder 199
448Box 6, folder 165-167
449Box 7, folder 200
450Box 7, folders 192-193
451Box 7, folder 201
452Box 7, folder 202
453Box 7, folders 192-193
454Box 7, folders 192-193
455Box 7, folder 203
456Box 7, folders 192-193
457Box 7, folder 204
458Box 7, folder 205
459Box 7, folder 206
460Box 7, folders 192-193
461Box 7, folder 207
462Box 8, folder 208
463Box 8, folder 209-210
464Box 8, folder 208
465Box 8, folder 211
466Box 8, folder 208
467Box 8, folder 208
468Box 8, folder 208
469Box 8, folder 208
470Box 8, folder 208
471Box 8, folder 208
472Box 8, folder 208
473Box 8, folder 208
474Box 8, folder 208
475Box 8, folder 208
476Box 8, folder 208
477Box 8, folder 208
478Box 8, folder 212
479Box 8, folder 213
480Box 8, folder 208
481Box 8, folder 208
483Box 8, folder 208
484Box 8, folder 208
485Box 8, folder 208
486Box 8, folder 208
487Box 8, folder 208
488Box 8, folder 208
489Box 8, folder 215
490Box 8, folders 216-218
491Box 8, folders 216-218
492Box 8, folders 216-218
493Box 8, folders 216-218
494Box 8, folders 216-218
495Box 8, folders 216-218
496Box 8, folders 216-218
497Box 8, folders 216-218
498Box 8, folders 216-218
499Box 8, folders 216-218
500Box 8, folders 216-218
501Box 8, folders 216-218
502Box 8, folders 219
503Box 8, folder 221
504Box 8, folder 222
505Box 8, folders 223-229
506Box 8, folder 230
507Box 8, folder 231
508Box 8, folders 216-218
509Box 8, folders 216-218
510Box 8, folders 216-218
511Box 8, folders 216-218
512Box 8, folders 216-218
513Box 8, folders 216-218
514Box 8, folder 232
515Box 8, folders 216-218
516Box 8, folders 216-218
517Box 8, folders 216-218
519Box 8, folders 216-218
520Box 8, folders 216-218
521Box 8, folders 216-218
522Box 8, folder 233
523Box 8, folders 216-218
525Box 8, folder 234
526Box 8, folders 216-218
527Box 8, folders 216-218
528Box 8, folders 216-218
529Box 8, folders 216-218
530Box 9, folder 237
531Box 8, folders 216-218
532Box 8, folders 216-218
533Box 9, folder 238
534Box 9, folder 239
535Box 8, folders 216-218
536Box 8, folders 216-218
537Box 8, folders 216-218
538Box 8, folders 216-218
539Box 9, folder 240
540Box 9, folder 241
541Box 8, folders 216-218
542Box 9, folder 242
543Box 9, folder 243
544Box 8, folders 216-218
545Box 9, folder 244
546Box 9, folder 246
547Box 9, folder 245
548Box 9, folder 247
549Box 9, folder 245
550Box 9, folder 248
551Box 9, folder 245
552Box 9, folder 245
553Box 9, folder 245
554Box 9, folder 245
555Box 9, folder 245
556Box 9, folder 245
557Box 9, folder 245
558Box 9, folder 245
559Box 9, folder 245
560Box 9, folder 245
561Box 9, folder 245
562Box 9, folder 250
563Box 9, folder 245
564Box 9, folder 245
565Box 9, folder 251
566Box 9, folder 252
567Box 9, folder 253
568Box 9, folder 254
569Box 9, folder 255
570Box 9, folder 256
571Box 9, folders 257-259
572Box 9, folders 257-259
573Box 9, folders 257-259
574Box 9, folder 261
575Box 9, folders 257-259
576Box 9, folders 257-259
577Box 9, folders 257-259
578Box 9, folders 257-259
579Box 9, folders 257-259
581Box 9, folders 257-259
582Box 9, folder 263
583Box 9, folder 264
584Box 9, folders 257-259
585Box 9, folders 257-259
586Box 9, folders 257-259
587Box 9, folders 257-259
588Box 9, folder 265
589Box 9, folders 257-259
590Box 9, folder 267
591Box 9, folder 266
592Box 9, folders 257-259
593Box 9, folders 257-259
594Box 9, folders 257-259
595Box 9, folder 269
596Box 9, folders 257-259
598Box 9, folders 257-259
599Box 9, folders 257-259
600Box 9, folders 257-259
601Box 9, folders 257-259
602Box 9, folders 257-259; box 10, folder 271
603Box 9, folders 257-259
604Box 9, folders 257-259
605Box 10, folder 272
606Box 9, folders 257-259
607Box 3, folder 62
608Box 2, folder 55
609Box 2, folder 56
612Box 10, folders 280-281
613Box 10, folders 273-274
614Box 10, folder 275
615Box 10, folder 282
616Box 10, folder 276
617Box 10, folder 278
618box 29, folders 535-537
619Box 10, folder 279
620Box 1, folder 31; box 4, folder 104; box 13, folder 374-375, 382
621Box 17, folder 396
622Box 29, folder 538
623Box 7, folder 180
624Box 27, folder 513
625Box 27, folder 515
626Box 26, folder 511; box 29, folders 533-534
627Box 19, folder 439; box 27. folders 516, 518-523
628Box 27, folders 519-523, box 29, folders 531-532
629Box 20, folder 461
630Box 1, folder 25
631Box 1, folder 28
632Box 1, folder 28
633Box 2, folders 34-36
636Box 20, folder 453
637Box 17, folder 392
638Box 19, folder 438
640Box 13, folder 349
642Box 11, folder 302
644Box 11, folder 303
645Box 2, folder 645; box11, foldeer 304
648Box 10, folder 284
650Box 2, folder 47
651Box 3, folder 60; box 11, folder 289; box 13, folder 334
652Box 11, folder 306
653Box 29, folder 539
654Box 11, folder 290, 301, 307; box 13, folder 342, 346, 371; box 29, folder 540
655Box 13, folders 338-339
656Box 3, folder 64; box 11, folder 291, 308; box 12, folders 322-323; box 13, folder 335, 350, 356, 358, 359; box 29, folder 539
657Box 11. 308
659Box 3, folder 65; box 13, folder 370
660Box 13, folder 336
661Box 11, folder 310
662Box 11, folder 311
663Box 13, folder 337
665Box 13, folders 338-339
666Box 13, folder 340
667Box 13, folder 342
668Box 4, folder 90
669Box 13, 343
670Box 11, folder 312
671Box 13, folder 348
672Boz 13, folder 360
673Box 11, folder 313
674Box 12, folders 322-323
675Box 13, folder 363
676Box 11, folder 295; box 13, folder 364
678Box 11, folder 296; box 12, folder 318
679Box 13, folder 344
680Box 6, folder 165-167
681Box 12, folder 325
682Box 11, folder 314; box 13, folder 345, 365, 372
683Box 11, folder 297; box 12, folder 315
684Box 12, folder 316
685Box 13, folder 376
686Box 13, folder 366
688Box 13, folder 347
689Box 11, folder 298; box 13, folder 367, 373,380
690Box 12, folder 319
691Box 12, folder 320
692Box 12, folder 321
693Box 9, folders 257-259
695Box 21, folder 469
696Box 12, folders 322-323
697Box 9, folder 266
698Box 3, folder 67
699Box 5, folder 147
702Box 8, folder 236
703Box 8, folder 230
704Box 9, folder 262
705Box 13, folder 379
706Box 11, folder 309
708Box 13, folder 377
709Box 12, folders 322-323
710Box 9, folder 270
711Box 3, folder 62
713Box 6, folder 150
714Box 21, folder 470-471
715Box 18, folder 416-427
716Box 18, folder 416-427
717Box 18, folder 416-427
718Box 3, folders 73-74; box 19, folder 437
801Box 26, folder 512
802Box 22, folder 472
803Box 12, folders 322-323
804Box 27, folders 519-523
805Box 13, folder 348
806Box 12, folder 326
807Box 12, folders 322-323
808Box 13, folder 348
810Box 13, folder 348
811Box 11, folder 300
812Box 13, folder 354, 357
814Box 13, folder 351
817Box 13, folder 361-362, 369; box 22, folder 472
818Box 29, folders 531-532
819Box 18, folder 415
821Box 10, folder 277
822Box 3, folder 103
823Box 8, folder 220
824Box 2, folders 34-36
825Box 2, folders 34-36
826Box 17, folder 392

Processing Information

The collection was largely catalogued prior to the creation of the finding aid. At that time it was loosely organized into genres and then arranged alphabetically. Individual catalogue cards were created for each document and each document was assigned a specific call number. Printed material were catalogued separately and assigned call numbers (Za C786+S1; Zza C786 S1; and Za F244 + S1).

A finding aid was created in 2010. At that time processed and unprocessed materials were integrated into one finding aid with a new title and a new call number. The new call number replaced the old, separate call numbers from the catalogue cards (an index to these old call numbers is provided in Appendix A). The old call numbers were: Uncat Za Cooper; YCAL MSS Misc 450 F-1; YCAL MSS Misc 450 F-2; YCAL MSS Misc 450 F-3; YCAL MSS Misc 450 F-4; Uncat Za File 720; Uncat Za File Cooper; Uncat Za File Coooper; Za C786+S1; Zza C786 S1; Za C786+1; and PC2 Shelf 5 #309.
Title
Guide to the James Fenimore Cooper Collection
Author
by H. Dean
Date
2010
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Repository

Contact:
P. O. Box 208330
New Haven CT 06520-8330 US
(203) 432-2977

Location

121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours

Access Information

The Beinecke Library is open to all Yale University students and faculty, and visiting researchers whose work requires use of its special collections. You will need to bring appropriate photo ID the first time you register. Beinecke is a non-circulating, closed stack library. Paging is done by library staff during business hours. You can request collection material online at least two business days in advance of your visit, using the request links in Archives at Yale. For more information, please see Planning Your Research Visit and consult the Reading Room Policies prior to visiting the library.