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J. B. Carrington papers

 Collection
Call Number: YCAL MSS 666

Scope and Contents

The J. B. Carrington Papers hold correspondence, literary manuscripts, photographs, and research files related to his career as an editor and writer at Scribner's Magazine. Correspondents include authors and artists who contributed work to the magazine, such as Frederick S. Church, James B. Connolly, Kenyon Cox, Andrew Lang, Maxfield Parrish, Frederick Waugh, and N. C. Wyeth, who are represented in the collection by letters and literary manuscripts. In addition, Carrington kept financial records on the company's literary assets, detailing prices paid to authors for work submitted, and tabulating the literary costs of each issue published between 1892 and 1906. Other correspondents in the papers relate to Carrington's research on contemporary wood engravers, including William B. Closson, Elbridge Kingsley, Gustav Kruell, Caroline Amelia Powell, and S. G. Putnam, among others. Also present are twenty-five art photographs taken by Carrington, who wrote on photography for Scribner's Magazine, and ephemera that documents his activities at the Salmagundi Club.

Dates

  • 1886 - 1934

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

The J. B. Carrington Papers is the physical property of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, consult the appropriate curator.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Walter H. Cook (Yale 1912), 1946.

Arrangement

Organized into five series: I. Correspondence, 1886-1934. II. Scribner's Magazine Records and Manuscripts, 1891-1919. III. Research and Writings on Wood Engraving and Engravers, 1887-1924. IV. Other Papers, 1893-1924. V. Photographs by J. B. Carrington, circa 1910.

Associated Materials

Carrington Family Papers (MS 130), Manuscripts and Archives, Sterling Memorial Library, Yale University

Extent

1.17 Linear Feet (4 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

https://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.carrington

Overview

The J. B. Carrington Papers hold correspondence, literary manuscripts, photographs, and research files related to his career as an editor and writer at Scribner's Magazine. Correspondents include authors and artists who contributed work to the magazine, such as Frederick S. Church, James B. Connolly, Kenyon Cox, Andrew Lang, Maxfield Parrish, Frederick Waugh, and N. C. Wyeth, who are represented by letters and literary manuscripts. In addition, Carrington kept financial records on the company's literary assets, detailing amounts paid to authors and tabulating the literary costs of each issue published between 1892 and 1906. Other correspondents in the papers relate to Carrington's research on contemporary wood engravers, including William B. Closson, Elbridge Kingsley, Gustav Kruell, Caroline Amelia Powell, and S. G. Putnam, among others. Also present are twenty-five art photographs taken by Carrington, who wrote on photography for Scribner's, and pieces of ephemera that document his activities at the Salmagundi Club.

J. B. Carrington (1860-1929)

James Beebee Carrington was born in Columbus, Ohio, the son of United States Army General and historian Henry Beebee Carrington (Yale 1845) and his first wife Margaret Irvin Sullivant. Wabash College records show that Carrington attended that college for two years while his father was an instructor there. In 1876-1877 he was a preparatory student enrolled in the "English Course," which had no Greek or Latin, and was intended more as a business track. The next academic year, 1877-1878, he was enrolled in the first year of the "Scientific Preparatory" program, which differed from the "Classical Preparatory" program in that it offered Latin, but no Greek instruction. While he did not complete a degree, Wabash College awarded him an honorary Master of Arts in 1897.

Carrington joined the staff of Scribner's Magazine when it was founded in 1887 and remained associated with the journal through his death, both as an editor and an author of feature articles, poems, and photographic essays. An active member of the Salmagundi Club in New York, he wrote for other periodicals and lectured publicly on the topics of art and illustration. Carrington had a particular interest in the technique of wood engraving and its practitioners, and contributed the biographical notes and bibliography to Philip Hamerton's two-volume work The Art of the American Wood-engraver (Scribner's, 1894).

J. B. Carrington died at his home on Nod Hill Road in Ridgefield, Connecticut, on July 14, 1929; he was survived by his wife Eva Doolittle Carrington, who died on August 6, 1942.

Processing Information

Collection are processed to a variety of levels, depending on the work necessary to make them usable, their perceived research value, the availability of staff, competing priorities, and whether or not further accruals are expected. The library attempts to provide a basic level of preservation and access for all collections, and does more extensive processing of higher priority collections as time and resources permit.

Materials comprising the J. B. Carrington Papers were received by the Yale University Library in 1946 from Walter Henry Cook (1896-1978), a graduate of Yale University (1919), and a resident on Nod Hill Road in Ridgefield, Connecticut. After they arrived at the library, the Carrington Family Papers were divided at some point, with papers related to Henry Beebee Carrington remaining in Sterling Memorial Library (Manuscripts and Archives Department) and parts of the papers distributed to other divisions of the library.

James B. Carrington's correspondence and papers related to his career at Scribner's Magazine were placed in the Yale Collection of American Literature and were moved into the Beinecke Library in 1963. This material had been classified as Za Carrington and is now in Series I, II, and IV. Within those papers, the records describing the Scribner company's literary assets had been sealed by the library from their arrival in 1946 through 1996.

Most of Carrington's letters from wood engravers remained in the Manuscript and Archives Department until they were transferred to the Beinecke Library in March 1978, and added to Za Carrington; this material is now in Series III.

The rest of Carrington's correspondence and research papers related to wood engraving were placed with Yale University Library's Arts of the Book Collection when that department was formed in 1967, and the papers kept there with the department's Prints and Plates Collection. That print collection was transferred to the Beinecke Library in 1999 and renamed the General Print Collection. The Carrington material was removed from the General Print Collection and reunited with the J. B. Carrington papers in 2012, where it is also now in Series III.

The set of twenty-five art photographs taken by Carrington were transferred from Manuscripts and Archives to the Beinecke Library in 1979 and placed under the call number Za Objects Art; they were reunited with the J. B. Carrington papers in 2012 and are now in Series V.
Title
Guide to the J. B. Carrington Papers
Author
by Sandra Markham
Date
2012
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Repository

Contact:
P. O. Box 208330
New Haven CT 06520-8330 US
(203) 432-2977

Location

121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours

Access Information

The Beinecke Library is open to all Yale University students and faculty, and visiting researchers whose work requires use of its special collections. You will need to bring appropriate photo ID the first time you register. Beinecke is a non-circulating, closed stack library. Paging is done by library staff during business hours. You can request collection material online at least two business days in advance of your visit, using the request links in Archives at Yale. For more information, please see Planning Your Research Visit and consult the Reading Room Policies prior to visiting the library.