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Bourne Family Papers

 Collection
Call Number: Gen MSS 1438

Scope and Contents

The Bourne Family Papers consist of materials that document the lives of abolitionist, minister and newspaper editor George Bourne, his wife Mary Oland Stibbs Bourne and their descendants. The majority of materials in the collection document the professional careers of George Bourne and his son Theodore Bourne. George Bourne's papers include an Anti-Slavery Lecture of 1837 as well as other religious writings. Theodore Bourne's papers relate to African American repatriation organizations such as the African Christian Civilization Society founded by Henry Highland Garnet. Correspondence between the Bourne and Stibbs family in England and the United States documents George and Mary Bourne's new life as they settled throughout the United States. Poems written by members of the Bourne Family such as Theodore Bourne and his brother William Oland Bourne are found in the collection. Other writings from abolitionists James Montgomery, Helen Maria Williams and John Greeenleaf Whitter are also included.

Dates

  • 1793–1919

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.

Conditions Governing Use

The Bourne Family Papers is the physical property of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, consult the appropriate curator.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from William Reese Co. (Swann Galleries sale, 2014 March 27, lot 41) on the Edwin J. Beinecke Book Fund.

Arrangement

Organized into three series: I. Correspondence (1793-1919). II. Professional Papers (1793-1910). III. Personal Papers (1793-1910).

Extent

1.67 Linear Feet (6 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

https://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.bourneg

Overview

The Bourne Family Papers consists of materials that document the lives of abolitionist, minister and newspaper editor George Bourne, his wife Mary Oland Stibbs Bourne and their descendants. The majority of materials in the collection document the professional careers of George Bourne and his son Theodore Bourne. George Bourne's papers include an Anti-Slavery Lecture of 1837 along with other religious writings. Theodore Bourne's papers chiefly relate to African American repatriation organizations such as the African Christian Civilization Society. Correspondence between the Bourne and Stibbs family in England and the United States document George and Mary Bourne's new life as they settled throughout the United States. Poems written by members of the Bourne Family and others such as abolitionists James Montgomery, Helen Maria Williams and John Greenleaf Whitter are also included.

Biographical / Historical

George Bourne was born on June 13, 1780 in Westbury, Wiltshire, England. In 1804, he married Mary Oland Stibbs (1780-1851), and they moved from England to the United States where they had ten children. George Bourne and his family moved frequently, settling in New York, Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. In 1810, George Bourne moved his family to New Glasgow, Virginia and became a Presbyterian minister. It was in Virginia that Bourne witnessed the American slavery system and as a result, became one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Bourne wrote many anti-slavery articles as the editor for the Christian Intelligencer and the Baltimore Daily Gazette. George Bourne wrote The Book and Slavery Irreconcilable (1816) and delivered The Anti-Slavery Lecture of 1837 in Newburyport, Massachusetts. George Bourne died in New York on November 20, 1845. George Bourne's sons Theodore Bourne (1822-1910), William Oland Bourne (1819-1901) and Rowland Hill Bourne (1812-1886) held similar anti-slavery and religious interests. William Oland Bourne and Rowland Hill Bourne became ministers while Theodore Bourne participated in African American repatriation movements such as the African Christian Civilization Society, which sought to encourage African American immigration to West Africa including Liberia and present day Nigeria.
Title
Guide to the Bourne Family Papers
Author
by Afua Ferdnance
Date
February 2017
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Repository

Contact:
P. O. Box 208330
New Haven CT 06520-8330 US
(203) 432-2977

Location

121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours

Access Information

The Beinecke Library is open to all Yale University students and faculty, and visiting researchers whose work requires use of its special collections. You will need to bring appropriate photo ID the first time you register. Beinecke is a non-circulating, closed stack library. Paging is done by library staff during business hours. You can request collection material online at least two business days in advance of your visit, using the request links in Archives at Yale. For more information, please see Planning Your Research Visit and consult the Reading Room Policies prior to visiting the library.