Skip to main content

COVID-19 Update

Read the Library Reopening FAQ and other COVID-19 updates. Library staff are providing online services and support.

Jacqueline de Jong papers

 Collection
Call Number: GEN MSS 832

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, printed materials, subject files, photographs and other papers relating to the life and work of Jacqueline de Jong from 1955 to 1983, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1960s. The production of de Jong’s magazine The Situationist Times is extensively documented through voluminous correspondence with co-editors, contributors, and publishers, as well as through production materials such as article submissions, original maquettes and distribution lists.

The collection offers rich documentation of the European avant-garde of the period thanks to de Jong’s connections with the Internationale situationniste (I.S.), Gruppe SPUR, and the Danish situationists. Correspondents include the artists and writers Noël Arnaud, Guy Atkins, Pol Bury, Guy Debord, Gordon Fazakerley, Asger Jorn, Dieter Kunzelmann, Jørgen Nash, and H. P. (Hans-Peter) Zimmer. De Jong’s subject files include tracts, manifestos, and periodicals issued by I.S. and Gruppe SPUR, as well as manuscript notes from the 1961 Göteberg Conference and materials relating to early situationist exhibitions. Original writings by Asger Jorn and Guy Atkins are also present.

The papers also include correspondence with gallery owners and original artists’ books created by de Jong that offer some documentation of her early artistic career beyond her involvement with situationist groups.

Dates

  • 1955 - 1983
  • Majority of material found within 1961 - 1969

Creator

Language of Materials

Chiefly in Dutch, English, French, and German, with some materials in Danish, Norwegian, and Italian.

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research.

Box 31: Restricted fragile material. Reference surrogates have been substituted in the main files. For further information consult the appropriate curator.

Conditions Governing Use

The Jacqueline de Jong Papers is the physical property of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, consult the appropriate curator.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Jacqueline de Jong on the Edith and Richard French Fund and the Frederick W. Hilles Fund, 2011-2013.

Arrangement

Organized into five series: I. Correspondence, 1955-1976. II. The Situationist Times Records, 1962-1970. III. Writings, 1962-1983. IV. Subject Files, 1957-1979. V. Professional Papers and Personal Papers, 1962-1975.

Extent

16.68 Linear Feet ((30 boxes) + 1 broadside)

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.dejong

Overview

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, printed materials, subject files, photographs and other papers relating to the life and work of Jacqueline de Jong from 1955 to 1983, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1960s. It offers rich documentation of the European avant-garde of the period thanks to de Jong’s connections with the Internationale situationniste (I.S.), Gruppe SPUR, and the Danish situationists. In particular, the production of de Jong’s magazine The Situationist Times is extensively documented through voluminous correspondence with co-editors, contributors, and publishers, as well as through production materials such as article submissions, original maquettes, and distribution lists.

Jacqueline de Jong

Jacqueline de Jong (1939-), is a Dutch artist. She was associated with the social, political, and artistic movements Internationale situationniste and Gruppe SPUR during the 1960s, and served as editor of The Situationist Times from 1962 to 1967.

De Jong was born in 1939 in Hengelo, Netherlands, to art collectors Hans and Alice de Jong. De Jong and her mother found refuge in Switzerland during World War II, after which they returned to the Netherlands. In 1958, De Jong obtained a position at the Stedelijk Museum, a contemporary arts institution located in Amsterdam. Her parents’ collecting and her experience at the museum exposed her to current artistic movements, including the Internationale situationniste (I.S.), recently formed by French intellectual Guy Debord and Danish artist Asger Jorn. Jorn had also been a founding member of the earlier avant-garde movements CoBrA (1948-1951) and International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus (1955-1957). De Jong and Jorn first met in 1958, and were romantic partners through the 1960s. De Jong herself joined the I.S. in 1960 and participated to the movement’s fourth conference in London in September of that year. Though one of few women in the movement’s inner circle, she assumed the leadership of its Dutch section.

De Jong’s time in the I.S. proved short lived, as Debord dismissed her in 1962, but her engagement with situationism continued. Now residing in Paris, France, she founded the English-language magazine The Situationist Times, which she designed, edited, printed, and distributed from 1962 to 1967. With her first solo show and her participation in a Gruppe SPUR exhibition, the year 1962 also marked the beginnings of de Jong’s professional art career. Through the 1960s, she exhibited paintings, sculptures, and drawings largely in the Netherlands, Denmark, and France. Involved in the politics of the day, de Jong participated in the May 1968 protests, and printed posters in support of the students on strike. In 1970, after the end of her relationship with Jorn, de Jong moved back to Amsterdam with gallerist Hans Brinkman to pursue her painting career.

The Situationist Times

The Situationist Times was a periodical in six issues published in Europe between 1962 and 1967 that blended situationist theory, political commentary, conceptual art, and avant-garde aesthetics.

The movement Internationale situationniste (I.S.) emerged out of the Internationale lettriste and the International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus in 1957, largely under the leadership of Guy Debord. The ideas of the group were embodied in the French-language journal Internationale situationniste, but did not have an English-language outlet. Disagreeing with Debord over the expulsion of the German Gruppe SPUR from the I.S. and over the role of visual arts in situationism, de Jong began publishing The Situationist Times shortly after he excluded her from the group.

Article contributions for the magazine came from practitioners of a range of disciplines active across Europe. With de Jong's original drawings, collages, and selections of photographic reproductions, the magazine's visual content reflected her artistic vision. The first issue, co-edited with French author Noël Arnaud, was released in May 1962 and focused heavily on Gruppe SPUR. De Jong, Arnaud, and Danish-Belgian artist Serge Vandercam co-edited the second issue, which was published in September 1962. The third issue, dated January 1963, was edited and published solely by de Jong, and printed in her home town of Hengelo, Netherlands. Articulated around the themes of knots, interlaces, and topology, it was the first in a thematic series. The subsequent issues were published and distributed by the Danish publishing company Rhodos. No. 4, released in October 1963, was the “labyrinths” issue, and no. 5, released in December 1964, was the “rings and chains” issue. Both were created in collaboration with English-born artist Gordon Fazakerley. Released in 1967, no. 6, the last published issue, exclusively contained original lithographs from 32 artists. De Jong planned a seventh issue on the theme of “wheels”, but never completed it.

Processing Information

Collections are processed to a variety of levels, depending on the work necessary to make them usable, their perceived research value, the availability of staff, competing priorities, and whether or not further accruals are expected. The library attempts to provide a basic level of preservation and access for all collections as they are acquired, and does more extensive processing of higher priority collections as time and resources permit.

This collection received a basic level of processing, including rehousing, minimal organization, and box-level description in 2013. Fuller processing, including arrangement work and more granular description, was provided in 2018.

Folder titles appearing in the contents list below are often based on those provided by the creator or previous custodian. Titles in quotation marks are transcriptions of original labels appearing on topical files. Otherwise, folder titles are supplied by staff during initial processing. Materials that have been physically separated from original groupings for preservation reasons are listed below their related files in non-sequential container order.

These materials have been arranged and described according to national and local standards. For more information, please refer to the Beinecke Manuscript Unit Processing Manual.

Title
Guide to the Jacqueline de Jong Papers
Author
by Ève Bourbeau-Allard
Date
December 2018
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Repository

Contact:
P. O. Box 208330
New Haven CT 06520-8330 US
(203) 432-2977

Location

121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours

Access Information

The Beinecke Library is open to all Yale University students and faculty, and visiting researchers whose work requires use of its special collections. You will need to bring appropriate photo ID the first time you register. Beinecke is a non-circulating, closed stack library. Paging is done by library staff during business hours. You can request collection material online at least two business days in advance of your visit, using the request links in Archives at Yale. For more information, please see Planning Your Research Visit and consult the Reading Room Policies prior to visiting the library.