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James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson papers

 Collection
Call Number: JWJ MSS 49

Scope and Contents

The James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers provide evidence of the personal and professional lives of James Weldon Johnson, Grace Nail Johnson, and to a lesser degree, the Johnson and Nail families, spanning the years 1850 to 2005, with the bulk of material dating between 1900 and 1976. The Papers chronicle Johnson’s writing career and involvement in education, politics, and cultural affairs and consist of a variety of documents, including correspondence, writings, personal papers, scrapbooks, photographs, artwork, objects, and audiovisual materials. Johnson was involved in a number of significant movements and organizations during his lifetime, and, as a result, the Papers also provide insight into broader topics in American and African-American history during the twentieth century.

Various facets of Johnson’s professional life are represented in the papers, with particular emphasis on Johnson’s career as an author. His writings include notes, background materials, drafts, published versions, and reviews, which combined, provide insight into various phases of the writing craft and the publishing process. Johnson often retained various drafts of his writings, many of which contain handwritten corrections and notes, providing rich evidence of his creative process. Johnson’s correspondence with Grace Nail also reveals his ideas and ambitions as an author. His correspondence records more broadly his literary and social circles, with correspondents such as writers Benjamin Brawley, William Stanley Braithwaite, Sterling Brown, Claude McKay, and Anne Spencer as well as publishers such as Alfred Harcourt and Alfred and Blanche Knopf. Throughout his career, and particularly during the Harlem Renaissance and his professorships at Fisk University and New York University, Johnson mentored many aspiring authors, a role that is documented in his correspondence. The Johnsons were an influential couple during the Harlem Renaissance, mentoring and hosting artists, and the Papers provide a window into this significant period in African-American cultural history.

Johnson’s work as an educator, lyricist, and member of the United States Consular Service, are also represented in the Papers. For example, his early career as a teacher and ongoing interest in education are illustrated in photographs of Johnson as Principal of Stanton School (Jacksonville, Florida), his correspondence with Atlanta University, and his writings about African-American education. Johnson’s tenure at Fisk University and New York University during the later period of his life is recorded in pedagogical documents ranging from lecture notes and syllabi to student papers. Combined, this material provides insight into Johnson’s role as an educator and his methods for teaching creative writing and literature.

Johnson’s work for the United States Consular Service is represented in his correspondence, reports, photographs, and printed ephemera, such as clippings and invitations. Johnson’s correspondence with Grace Nail during this period also provides insight into his experience with the Consular Service. In addition this material documents American interests in South America during this period, such as the American intervention in Nicaragua, and consular life.

Johnson’s work as a lyricist and collaboration with his brother Rosamond Johnson and Bob Cole are chronicled in Johnson’s writings, which include drafts for various short song lyrics and “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing.” The Cole and Johnson Brothers song-writing team is also captured in photographs such as a portrait autographed by all three members. Johnson also maintained scrapbooks on musical comedy and theatre documenting various productions and performers during the early twentieth century. The Papers are thus a resource for understanding theatre and performance, particularly in New York, during the first half of the twentieth century. In addition to Johnson’s own materials relating to his work as a lyricist are those of his brother as well as research material gathered by Johnson while writing Black Manhattan.

There is a small amount of material relating to Johnson’s role in the N.A.A.C.P., however, the majority of this documentation is in the N.A.A.C.P. records at the Library of Congress. The Beinecke Library holds some of Johnson’s N.A.A.C.P. writings, such as his series of essays "Self Determining Haiti" based on his investigation on behalf of the Association on the American occupation of Haiti. In addition, Johnson’s personal relationships with prominent N.A.A.C.P. Board members, such as Arthur B. Spingarn, Joel E. Spingarn, and Mary White Ovington, are documented in his correspondence. A number of snapshots also record the Johnsons’ visits with Ovington at her home “Riverbank,” which influenced the Johnsons to likewise choose Great Barrington, Massachusetts, as the site for their summer home “Five Acres.”

The Johnsons’ personal lives are also richly documented in the Papers, which include correspondence from early in their marriage, snapshots of the couple with friends and family, legal and financial records, and a number of other personal effects, ranging from stationery and Johnson’s last pen to monogrammed towels.

The Johnsons’ family and close friends (chiefly their protégée Ollie Jewell Sims Okala) are also documented in the Papers. Correspondence between family members as well as formal and candid photographs provide insight into the Johnson and Nail families, members of which are prominent in their own right. For example, Johnson’s correspondence with his brother, Rosamond, reveals information about the latter’s career as a successful musician and performer. The correspondence also records the lives of John B. Nail and John E. Nail, who were influential African-American businessmen largely involved in real estate. Other documents, ranging from legal and financial papers to personal papers, similarly document the Johnson and Nail families. For example, Mrs. Johnson avidly collected newspaper clippings and created scrapbooks, and in addition to documenting the Johnsons, this material chronicles the lives of John B. Nail, John E. Nail, Rosamond Johnson, and Mildred Johnson.

Dates

  • circa 1850-2005
  • Majority of material found within 1900 - 1976

Creator

Language of Materials

Chiefly in English; some materials in Spanish and French.

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.

Box 155 (Legal and financial records): Temporarily restricted. For further information consult the appropriate curator.

Box 156: Restricted fragile material. Reference surrogates have been substituted in the main files. For further information consult the appropriate curator.

Conditions Governing Use

The James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers are the physical property of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University. Literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. For further information, consult the appropriate curator.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Grace Nail Johnson, 1941-1976; Gift of Ollie Jewell Sims Okala, 1976-2001; Purchased from Sondra Kathryn Wilson on the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Negro Arts & Letters Fund, 2002-2006.

Arrangement

Organized into eleven series: I. Correspondence, 1896-1972; II. Writings, 1890-1974; III. Consular Service, 1906-1912; IV. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 1917-1965; V. Personal Papers, 1892-1988; VI. Printed Material, 1928-1973; VII. Legal and Financial Records, 1906-1998; VIII. Family Papers, 1872-2005; IX. Photographs, 1850-1985; X. Art and Objects, 1850-1980; and XI. Audiovisual Material, 1949-1995.

Extent

141.73 Linear Feet ((158 boxes) + 2 record album storage, 8 broadside, 2 roll, 4 art, 1 cold storage)

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/beinecke.jwj

Overview

The James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers provide evidence of the personal and professional lives of James Weldon Johnson, Grace Nail Johnson, and to a lesser degree, the Johnson and Nail families, spanning the years 1850 to 2005, with the bulk of material dating between 1900 and 1976. The papers chronicle Johnson’s writing career and involvement in education, politics, and cultural affairs and consist of a variety of documents, including correspondence, writings, personal papers, scrapbooks, photographs, artwork, objects, and audiovisual materials. Johnson was involved in a number of significant movements and organizations during his lifetime, and, as a result, the Papers also provide insight into broader topics in American and African-American history during the twentieth century.

JAMES WELDON JOHNSON (1871-1938)

James Weldon Johnson was born on June 17, 1871, in Jacksonville, Florida. Both of his parents were freeborn, and his family was relatively well-to-do. Johnson's father, James Johnson, was the head waiter in local resort hotel and the minister of a small church. His mother, Helen Louise Johnson, was the daughter of a prominent black civil servant in Nassau. She was well educated and taught in the local black school. Johnson had one brother, John Rosamond Johnson, and an adopted sister, Agnes M. Edwards.

Johnson attended Stanton School, in Jacksonville, where his mother and eventually his sister taught. The school provided only an elementary education, but Johnson was an apt student and received encouragement at home. At this time he became fluent in Spanish through association with a young Cuban who was his family's ward. In 1887 Johnson entered the junior preparatory department of Atlanta University. Despite a year's absence he advanced rapidly to the college department and was graduated in 1894. During his year's absence he continued his studies in Greek and Latin under a private tutor, and he also had access to the library of a local white physician. It was during his school years that Johnson began to write poetry and songs, and he also at that time set out to develop himself as a public speaker. Johnson's associations with Atlanta University continued to be productive throughout his life. Among the alumni of the school were a substantial number of college teachers, college administrators, and businessmen, with whom Johnson became acquainted later in his life. From 1924 until his death he was an active member of the school's Board of Trustees.

After graduating from Atlanta, Johnson returned to Jacksonville to take over the principalship of Stanton School. Each year he added a grade to the school until he developed Stanton into a high school. Becoming recognized as a leader in black education, Johnson was elected president of the Negro State Teacher's Association. He retained the principalship of Stanton School until 1902, but did not limit his interests to his duties there. With a group of friends he founded The Daily American, the first daily black newspaper in the country. Though the paper met with initial success the backers were forced to suspend publication after eight months. Johnson then turned his attention to reading for the law. In 1897 he passed the entrance examination for the Florida State Bar, becoming the first black man licensed in that state by an open examination. He found, however, that there was little chance of a black man making a living from the practice of law.

Johnson's most important activity outside of Stanton School was lyric writing. His brother, J. Rosamond Johnson, in partnership with Bob Cole, was beginning to be successful in musical comedy. Rosamond persuaded his brother to add words to some tunes he had written, and between 1899 and 1902 Johnson spent his winters at Stanton and his summers in New York writing lyrics. The song writing team of Cole and Johnson brothers became relatively successful, and Johnson helped in writing many songs that were popular successes. The most enduring piece written by the Johnson brothers was "Lift Every Voice and Sing" (1900), which became the official song of the N.A.A.C.P. and is known as the "Negro National Anthem."

Johnson's success as a lyricist induced him to leave Jacksonville and move to New York permanently in 1902. He continued to write lyrics but again started a new group of activities. Between 1902 and 1906 he attended Columbia University, taking courses in literature from Brander Matthews. Johnson was also active in New York politics, helping to found the Colored Republican Club of New York, and serving as its president.

Johnson entered the United States Consular Service in 1906. This came about largely as a result of his activities on behalf of the Republican Party and the efforts of Booker T. Washington and Charles W. Anderson, an influential black New York politician. He was assured of a good career in the service as long as the Republicans were in power, and served as a consul for six years. From 1906 to 1909 he was posted in Puerto Cabello, Venezuela. This post was considered a sinecure even though Johnson performed the consular duties there for Cuba, Panama, and France as well as for the United States. In 1909 he was promoted and transferred to Corinto, Nicaragua, where Johnson's duties were more demanding than they had been at Puerto Cabello. During his stay in Corinto that city for several days was the scene of gunfire resulting from an attempt to overthrow the Nicaraguan government. Johnson negotiated with both sides and coordinated his actions with the United States Navy.

While Johnson was in the consular service he continued to write poetry and managed to have some of his pieces published. In 1910, he married Grace Nail, a member of a wealthy and distinguished black New York family. He also found time to write a novel, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, (1912). Johnson made a good record in the consular service but as consular posts were at that time used for political patronage, opportunities for advancement would disappear with the advent of a Democratic administration in 1913. Rather than face a long period of service in Corinto, Johnson resigned from the service in 1913 and returned to Jacksonville to put his father's estate in order. After remaining there for a year he began to divide his time between Jacksonville and New York, in order to reestablish himself as a lyricist. He collaborated with Will Marion Cook, Harry T. Burleigh, and James Reese Europe, the top talents of the period. Musical taste, however, had changed greatly in the preceding ten years, and Johnson had little success. He did translate the libretto of Fernando Periquet's Goyescas, which was performed at the Metropolitan Opera House.

Johnson met with more success outside the field of music. In 1914 he became a contributing editor to the New York Age, and in 1917 his first volume of poetry, Fifty Years and Other Poems, was published. The New York Age under the editorship of Fred Moore was an influential black paper with strong ties to Booker T. Washington. Johnson wrote a weekly column called "Views and Reviews" and contributed unsigned editorials. Through his association with the New York Age he was invited to the Amenia Conference of 1916. There he met and impressed Joel E. Spingarn. Despite Johnson's position on an anti-N.A.A.C.P. paper, Spingarn offered him the job of Field Secretary for the Association, which he accepted.

Johnson's association with the N.A.A.C.P. continued from 1916 until his death. As Field Secretary he helped establish a strong network of local branches. He expanded the organization in the South, a section that had not received emphasis in the National Office. In 1920 Johnson became the Executive Secretary of the Association, and in that year he investigated for the Association the nature of the United States occupation of Haiti. As a result of this investigation he wrote a series of articles called "Self Determining Haiti". Johnson's tenure in the secretaryship marked the strengthening of the National Office, reflecting the growing influence of the organization. He was particularly active in lobbying for an anti-lynching bill. In 1931 Johnson resigned the secretaryship, was elected to the Board of Directors, and became one of the vice-presidents of the organization in which he remained active for the rest of his life. After his resignation from the National Office of the N.A.A.C.P., Johnson was appointed to the Spence Chair of Creative Literature at Fisk University.

During the years he was Executive Secretary of the N.A.A.C.P., Johnson continued his interest in black music and poetry. As Secretary he had contact and close friendships with New York's leading liberals and publishers and used his influence to promote his own work and that of the young black writers of the Harlem Renaissance period. Johnson's second book of poetry, God's Trombones, was published in 1927. He also prepared three anthologies of black poetry and music: The Book of American Negro Poetry (1922, revised 1931); The Book of American Negro Spirituals, (1925); and The Second Book of American Negro Spirituals, (1926). In 1930 Johnson received a Rosenwald Fellowship, which he used to write a cultural history of blacks in New York, Black Manhattan (1930).

Johnson's move to Fisk began the last phase of his life. Most of his time was devoted to teaching at Fisk and at New York University. He continued his interest in young black writers as well as in his own writing. Johnson published three more books in this last phase of his life: Negro Americans, What Now? (1934); Along This Way, The Autobiography of James Weldon Johnson, (1934); and a volume of poetry, Saint Peter Relates An Incident, (1936). Johnson also undertook several lecture tours each year, speaking most frequently on some aspect of the race situation, or the "Negro's Contribution to American Culture." In addition to being on the Board of Directors of the N A.A.C.P. and the Board of Trustees of Atlanta University, he was a member of the Board of Trustees of Palmer Memorial Institute, and he lent his name and support to many other organizations, including the American Fund for Public Service, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Delta Phi Delta journalistic society.

James Weldon Johnson died in 1938 at the age of 67, when his car was struck by a train at a railway crossing in Maine.
GRACE NAIL JOHNSON (1885-1976) Grace Nail Johnson was born on February 27th in New London, Connecticut to John Bennett Nail (1853-1942) and Mary Frances Robinson Nail (1858-1923) the second of the couple’s two surviving children, the other being John Edward Nail (1884-1947). Grace Nail met James Weldon Johnson in 1904 while attending the theatre. The couple became engaged in 1909 and married on February 3, 1910 in New York City.

The Nail family was an important member of New York City’s African-American social and business circles largely due to John B. Nail’s role as a prominent businessman and political leader. John Nail and his brother, Edward, established a popular hotel and café, “Nail Brothers,” in the neighbourhood that would become Greenwich Village, as well as the Shakespeare Hotel in Washington, D.C. John Nail also owned extensive real estate in Harlem, and, through the real estate work of his son, John Edward, the Nails were instrumental in opening up Harlem to African-Americans during the early and mid-twentieth century. The Nails actively encouraged aspiring musicians and actors and were engaged in various artistic and intellectual circles, which included, for example, Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington.

Grace Nail Johnson shared with her husband an interest in arts and culture as well as social welfare. Grace Nail provided support for Johnson throughout his career. She studied French and Spanish in preparation for diplomatic life and visited publishers in New York on Johnson’s behalf while he remained in Nicaragua in 1912. Among the various organizations Grace Nail volunteered for were the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Anti-Lynching Crusaders, and the Circle for Negro Relief. She was also recognized as an influential hostess who mentored a number of young authors during various periods of the couple’s life ranging from the Harlem Renaissance to Johnson’s professorships at Fisk University and New York University.

Grace Nail Johnson played an important role in ensuring Johnson’s legacy following his death in 1938. For example, she worked with publishers and researchers in order to encourage Johnson scholarship and collaborated with Carl Van Vechten to establish in 1941 the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Negro Arts and Letters housed at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. In addition to donating Johnson’s and her own papers to the Library, Grace Nail Johnson also convinced other authors and leading African-American figures to donate their archives to the collection.

Grace Nail Johnson died at the age of 91 on November 1, 1976 at her home in Harlem, New York. Her ashes were interred, with Johnson’s, in the Nail plot at Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York.
Nail Family Tree The following family trees outline Grace Nail Johnson's paternal (Nail) and maternal (Robinson) families. These individuals are represented in both Family Correspondence and Photographs.

Nail Family

-Edward Nail

-John Bennett Nail (1853-1942) m. Mary Frances Robinson (1858-1923)

--John Edward Nail (1883-1947) m. Grayce Fairfax (1884-1960s)

--Grace Nail (1885-1976) m. James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938)

--Frank Nail (1887-1889)

Robinson Family

James Robinson m. Ellen Robinson

-Josephine Robinson (1857-1948) m. Henry C. Miller (1841-)

--Edna Frances Miller (1880-)

--Helen Gertrude Miller (1882-)

--Ernest H. Miller (1884-)

--Frederick Miller (1891-)

-Lottie L. Robinson m. Henry Griffin

-Cornelia Robinson m. Mr. Jordan

--Gladys Jordan m. Mr. Marshall

---1 daughter and 3 sons

-Mary Frances Robinson (1858-1923)
OLLIE JEWELL SIMS OKALA (1908-2001) Ollie Jewel Sims Okala was born in Arkansas on August 14, 1908 to Edward Sims and Elizabeth Marsh Sims (born 1885). Okala was the youngest of three children; the couple’s other children were Eddie Sims (1905-1990) and Kennerbelle Sims (1907-1997). Okala graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from Philander Smith College (Little Rock, Arkansas) in 1931 and went on to study nursing at Meharry Medical College, graduating in 1934. Okala continued her studies at Columbia University where she studied Public Health Nursing (M.A., 1937). In 1942 Okala was hired at Roosevelt Hospital where she continued to work until her retirement in 1970. Okala married Julius Byron Etuka Okala (b. 1912) in 1942. Nigerian born, Okala moved to the U.S. in 1939 in order to pursue studies at Lincoln University. He continued his studies at Northwestern University (B.A., Anthropology, 1943) and Columbia University (M.A., Anthropology, 1949; PhD, Education, 1954).

James Weldon Johnson was one of Ollie Jewel Sims Okala’s first patients, and through this chance experience, Okala became a close friend of the Johnsons. When Okala moved to New York City the Johnsons helped her secure a nursing position, and, in turn, Okala provided support for the Johnsons. In later years Okala lived with Grace Nail Johnson. Following Grace Nail Johnson’s death in 1976, Okala continued to reside in the apartment and was designated literary executor of the Johnson estate. Okala died on September 9, 2001 and her ashes were interred in the Nail plot at Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York.

Appendix A: Former Call Number Reference

The index below provides a cross reference from the catalogue card numbers, noted as —#, to the current location of the same material in the present arrangement.

1: Box 67, folder 280

2: Box 76, folder 481

3: Box 76, folder 482

4: Box 76, folder 483

5: Box 76, folder 486

6: Box 77, folder 565

7: Box 77, folder 566

8: Box 77, folder 567

9: Box 76, folder 499

10: Box 76, folder 502

11: Box 76, folder 503

12: Box 76, folder 504

13: Box 77, folder 511

14: Box 77, folder 512

15: Box 77, folder 526

16: Box 77, folder 527

17: Box 77, folder 528

18: Box 77, folder 529

19: Box 77, folder 530

20: Box 77, folder 546

21: Box 77, folder 547

22: Box 77, folder 548

23: Box 77, folder 549

24: Box 76, folder 500

25: Box 76, folder 501

26: Box 77, folder 510

27: Box 77, folder 569

28: Box 77, folder 551

29: Box 77, folder 521

30: Box 77, folder 522

31: Box 77, folder 524

32: Box 77, folder 525

33: Box 77, folder 564

34: Box 76, folder 464

35: Box 76, folder 465

36: Box 76, folder 466

37: Box 76, folder 467

38: Box 76, folder 468

39: Box 76, folder 469

40: Box 76, folder 470

41: Box 76, folder 471

42: Box 76, folder 472

43: Box 76, folder 473

44: Box 76, folder 474

45: Box 76, folder 475

46: Box 76, folder 476

47: Box 76, folder 477

48: Box 76, folder 478

49: Box 76, folder 479

50: Box 76, folder 480

51: Box 76, folder 484

52: Box 76, folder 485

53: Box 76, folder 487

54: Box 76, folder 487

55: Box 76, folder 488

56: Box 76, folder 489

57: Box 76, folder 490

58: Box 76, folder 491

59: Box 76, folder 492

60: Box 76, folder 492

61: Box 76, folder 493

62: Box 76, folder 494

63: Box 76, folder 495

64: Box 76, folder 496

65: Box 76, folder 497

66: Box 76, folder 498

67: Box 76, folder 505

68: Box 76, folder 506

69: Box 76, folder 507

70: Box 76, folder 508

71: Box 77, folder 509

72: Box 77, folder 513

73: Box 77, folder 514

74: Box 77, folder 514

75: Box 77, folder 515

76: Box 77, folder 516

77: Box 77, folder 517

78: Box 77, folder 518

79: Box 77, folder 519

80: Box 77, folder 520

81: Box 77, folder 531

82: Box 77, folder 532

83: Box 77, folder 533

84: Box 77, folder 534

85: Box 77, folder 535

86: Box 77, folder 536

87: Box 77, folder 537

88: Box 77, folder 538

89: Box 77, folder 539

90: Box 77, folder 540

91: Box 77, folder 541

92: Box 77, folder 542

93: Box 77, folder 543

94: Box 77, folder 544

95: Box 77, folder 545

96: Box, 77, folder 550

97: Box 77, folder 552

98: Box 77, folder 553

99: Box 77, folder 555

100: Box 77, folder 556

101: Box 77, folder 557

102: Box 77, folder 558

103: Box 77, folder 559

104: Box 77, folder 560

105: Box 77, folder 561

106: Box 77, folder 561

107: Box 77, folder 562

108: Box 77, folder 563

109: Box 77, folder 568

110: Box 45, folder 87

111a: Box 45, folders 88-89

112: Boxes 45-46, folders 91-94

113: Box 45, folder 90

114: Box 46, folders 95-97

115: Box 47, folders 98-101

116: Box 47, folders 102-103

117: Box 48, folders 104-107

118: Box 49, folders 108-111

119: Box 117, folder 1060

120: Box 118, folder 1061

120a: Box 49, folder 113

121: Box 82, folder 619

122: Box 82, folder 620

123: Box 82, folder 621-623

124: Box 82, folder 621-623

125: Box 82, folder 624

126: Box 82, folder 625

127: Box 82, folder 626

128: Box 67, folders 281-282

129: Box 67, folders 281-282

130: Box 67, folder 283

131: Box 67, folder 284

132: Box 67, folder 285

133: Box 67, folder 286

134: Box 67, folder 287

135: Box 67, folders 289-290

136: Box 67, folders 289-290

137: Box 88, folder 704

138: Box 67, folder 291

139: Box 74, folder 436

140: Box 85, folder 661

141: Box 50, folders 115-116

142: Box 50, folder 117

143: Box 50, folder 118

144: Box 50, folder 119

145: Box 67, folder 292

146: Box 67, folder 293

147: Box 67, folder 293

148: Box 75, folder 452

149: Box 85, folder 662

150: Box 85, folder 662

151: Box 74, folder 437

152: Box 53, folders 141-142

153: Box 53, folder 143

154: Box 53, folder 144

155: Box 53, folders 145-146

156: Box 121, folder 1069

157: Box 54, folders 147-148

158: Box 54, folders 147-148

159: Box 67, folder 295

160: Box 55, folder 153

161: Box 55, folder 154

162: Box 55, folder 155

163: Box 55, folder 156

164: Box 55, folder 157

165: Box 55, folder 159

166: Box 55, folder 160

167: Box 55, folder 161

168: Box 55, folder 162

169: BSD, folder 1070

170: Box 56, folder 164

171: Box 56, folders 165-167

172: Box 81, folder 600

173: Box 81, folder 601

174: Box 81, folder 602

175: Box 81, folder 603

176: Box 81, folder 604

177: Box 81, folder 605

178: Box 81, folder 606

179: Box 81, folder 607

180: Box 81, folder 608

181: Box 67, folder 296

182: Box 67, folder 297

183: Box 67, folder 298

184: Box 67, folder 299

185: Box 85, folder 668

186: Box 67, folder 303

187: Box 68, folder 327

188-1: Box 74, folder 438

188-2: Box 74, folder 439

189: Box 67, folder 305

190: Box 89, folder 706

191: Box 67, folder 307

192: Box 67, folder 308

193: Box 74, folder 440

194: Box 74, folder 441

195: Box 74, folder 442

196: Box 74, folder 443

197: Box 67, folder 310

198: Box 75, folder 447

199: Box 75, folder 448

200: Box 68, folder 311

201: Box 68, folder 312

202: Box 68, folder 313

203: Box 91, folder 735

204: Box 75, folder 449

205: Box 75, folder 450

206: Box 59, folder 187

207: Box 59, folder 188

208: Box 59, folder 189

209: Box 59, folder 190

210: Box 59, folder 191

211: Box 59, folder 192

212: Box 59, folder 193

213: Box 59, folder 194

214: Box 59, folder 195

215: Box 59, folder 196

216: Box 59, folder 197

217: Box 59, folder 198

218: Box 59, folder 199

219: Box 59, folder 200

220: Box 78, folder 571

221: Box 78, folder 572

222: Box 78, folder 573

223: Box 78, folder 574

224: Box 78, folder 575

225: Boxes 78-79, folders 576-580

226: Box 80, folder 582

227: Box 80, folder 583

228: Box 80, folder 584

229: Box 80, folder 585

230: Box 80, folder 586

231: Box 80, folder 587

232: Box 80, folder 588 and 590

233: Box 81, folder 589

234: Box 81, folder 590

235: Box 81, folder 590

236: Box 81, folder 591

237: Box 91, folder 738

238: Box 75, folder 451

239: Box 59, folder 202

240: Box 59, folder 202

241: Box 59, folder 202

242: Box 59, folder 203

243: Box 59, folder 203

244: Box 59, folder 203

245: Box 59, folder 203

246: Box 59, folder 203

247: Box 59, folder 203

248: Box 59, folder 203

249: Box 59, folder 203

250: Box 59, folder 203

251: Box 59, folder 204

252: Box 59, folder 204

253: Box 59, folder 204

254: Box 59, folder 204

255: Box 59, folder 204

256: Box 59, folder 204

257: Box 59, folder 204

258: Box 59, folder 205

259: Box 59, folder 205

260: Box 60, folder 208

261: Box 60, folder 208

262: Box 60, folder 208

263: Box 60, folder 208

264: Box 60, folder 208

265: Box 60, folder 209

266: Box 60, folder 209

267: Box 60, folder 209

268: Box 60, folder 211

269: Box 60, folder 212

270: Box 60, folder 212

271: Box 60, folder 212

272: Box 60, folder 212

273: Box 60, folder 212

274: Box 60, folder 214

275: Box 60, folder 214

276: Box 60, folder 214

277: Box 60, folder 214

278: Box 60, folder 214

279: Box 60, folder 215

280: Box 60, folder 215

281: Box 60, folder 215

282: Box 60, folder 215

283: Box 60, folder 216

284: Box 60, folder 216

285: Box 60, folder 216

286: Box 60, folder 216

287: Box 60, folder 216

288: Box 60, folder 216

289: Box 60, folder 216

290: Box 60, folder 217

291: Box 60, folder 217

292: Box 60, folder 218

293: Box 63, folder 241

294: Box 60, folder 213

295: Box 60, folder 213

296: Box 63, folder 240

297: Box 90, folder 716

298: Box 90, folder 717

299: Box 90, folder 718

300: Box 85, folders 646-649 and BSD, folder 1099

301: Box 85, folders 647-649 and BSD, folder 1099

302: Box 85, folders 647-649 and BSD, folder 1099

303: Box 68, folder 315

304: Box 68, folder 316

305: Box 68, folder 316

306: Box 68, folder 316

307: Box 68, folder 316

308: Box 68, folder 317

309: Box 75, folder 453

310: Box 85, folder 670

311: Box 91, folder 746

312: Box 68, folder 318

313: Box 68, folder 318

314: Box 68, folder 318

315: Box 68, folder 318

316: Box 68, folder 319

317: Box 68, folder 319

318: Box 81, folder 609

319: Box 81, folder 610

320: Box 81, folder 611

321: Box 68, folder 320

322: Box 68, folder 320

323: Box 68, folder 320

324: Box 68, folder 321

325: Box 67, folder 294

326: Box 82, folder 627

327: Box 82, folder 628

328: Box 82, folder 628

328a: Box 63, folder 244

329: Box 75, folder 455

330: Box 68, folder 324

331: Box 85, folders 664-665

331a: Box 85, folder 669

332: Box 68, folder 325

333: Box 68, folder 326

334: Box 63, folder 247

335: Box 63, folder 248

336: Box 63, folder 249

337: Box 63, folder 250 and BSD, folder 1071

338: BSD, folder 1072

339: Box 63, folder 251 and BSD, folder 1073

340: Box 67, folder 300

341: Box 67, folder 301

342: Box 67, folder 302

343: Box 67, folder 302

344: Box 68, folders 332-333

345: Box 68, folders 332-333

346: Box 68, folder 336

347: Box 68, folder 337

348: Box 68, folder 338

349: Box 68, folder 339

350: Box 85, folder 659

351: Box 85, folder 660

352: Box 85, folder 660

353: Box 68, folder 340

354: Box 73, folder 386

355: Box 73, folder 386

356: Box 68, folder 341

357: Box 68, folder 342

358: Box 68, folder 342

359: Box 73, folder 361

360: Box 73, folder 361

361: Box 73, folder 361

362: Box 73, folder 361

363: Box 73, folder 362

364: Box 73, folder 363

365: Box 83, folder 635

366: Box 83, folder 636

367: Box 83, folder 637

368: Box 83, folder 638

369: Box 83, folder 639

370: Box 83, folder 640

371: Box 83, folder 641

372: Box 83, folder 642

373: Box 84, folder 643

374: Box 84, folder 644

375: Box 84, folder 645

376: Box 90, folder 715

377: Boxes 89-90, folders 710-714

378: Box 73, folder 364

379: Box 73, folder 365

380: Box 73, folder 366

381: Box 73, folder 368

382: Box 73, folder 369

383: Box 73, folder 369

384: Box 73, folder 370

385: Box 73, folder 371

386: Box 73, folder 372

387: Box 73, folder 372

388: Box 73, folder 372

389: Box 73, folder 373

390: Box 73, folder 373

391: Box 82, folder 629

392: Box 82, folder 629

393: Box 82, folder 630

394: Box 91, folder 744

395: Box 91, folder 740 and 745

396: Box 91, folder 747

397: Box 91, folder 733

398: Box 91, folder 736 and 742

399: Box 96, folders 798-802

400: Box 91 , folder 739 and box 92, folder 749

401: Box 73, folder 374

402: Box 73, folder 392

403: Box 73, folder 394

404: Box 73, folder 395

405: Box 73, folder 397

406: Box 73, folder 397

407: Box 74, folder 398

408: Box 74, folder 399

409: Box 74, folder 399

410: Box 74, folder 400

411: Box 74, folder 400

412: Box 74, folder 402

413: Box 74, folder 402

414: Box 74, folder 402

415: Box 74, folder 403

416: Box 74, folder 403

417: Box 74, folder 404

418: Box 74, folder 405

419: Box 74, folder 407

420: Box 74, folder 408

421: Box 74, folder 408

422: Box 74, folder 408

423: Box 74, folder 409

424: Box 74, folder 410

425: Box 74, folder 410

426: Box 74, folder 411

427: Box 74, folder 435

428: Box 74, folder 414

429: Box 74, folder 415

430: Box 74, folder 415

431: Box 74, folder 415

432: Box 74, folder 415

433: Box 74, folder 416

434: Box 74, folder 416

434a: Box 74, folder 417

435: Box 74, folder 418

436: Box 74, folder 418

437: Box 74, folder 419

438: Box 74, folder 419

439: Box 74, folder 419

440: Box 74, folder 419

441: Box 74, folder 419

442: Box 74, folder 419

443: Box 74, folder 419

444: Box 74, folder 419

445: Box 74, folder 420

446: Box 74, folder 420

447: Box 74, folder 420

448: Box 74, folder 420

449: Box 74, folder 421

450: Box 74, folder 422

451: Box 74, folder 423

452: Box 74, folder 424

453: Box 74, folder 425

454: Box 74, folder 426

455: Box 74, folder 428

456: Box 74, folder 428

457: Box 74, folder 428

458: Box 74, folder 429

459: Box 74, folder 429

460: Box 74, folder 430

461: Box 74, folder 430

462: Box 74, folder 431

463: Box 74, folder 431

464: Box 74, folder 431

465: Box 74, folder 432

466: Box 74, folder 432

467: Box 74, folder 432

468: Box 74, folder 432

469: Box 74, folder 432

470: Box 74, folder 433

471: Box 74, folder 434

472: Box 73, folder 375

473: Box 73, folder 375

474: Box 75, folders 444-446

475: Box 75, folders 444-446

476: Box 75, folders 444-446

477: Box 85, folder 667

478: Box 81, folder 593

479: Box 81, folder 594

480: Box 81, folder 595

481: Box 81, folder 596

482: Box 81, folder 596

483: Box 81, folder 596

484: Box 81, folder 596

485: Box 81, folder 596

486: Box 81, folder 597

487: Box 81, folder 597

488: Box 81, folder 597

489: Box 81, folder 597

490: Box 73, folder 377

491: Box 82, folder 612

492: Box 82, folder 612

493: Box 82, folder 612

494: Box 82, folder 613 and box 119, folder 1065

495: Box 82, folder 615

495a: Box 82, folder 616

496: Box 82, folder 617

497: Box 82, folder 614 and box 119, folder 1065

498: Box 82, folder 618

499: Box 64, folders 261-262

500: Box 64, folder 263

501: Box 64, folder 263

502: Box 64, folders 265-266

503: BSD, folder 1074

504: Box 64, folder 264

505: Box 64, folder 264

506: Box 64, folder 264

507: Box 64, folder 264

508: Box 64, folder 264

509: Box 64, folder 264

510: Box 64, folder 260

511: Box 64, folder 260

512: Box 64, folder 264

513: Box 64, folder 264

514: Box 64, folder 264

515: Box 64, folder 264

516: Box 64, folder 264

517: Box 64, folder 253

518: Box 64, folder 253

519: Box 64, folder 254

520: Box 64, folder 255

521: Box 64, folder 256

522: Box 64, folder 257

523: Box 64, folder 258

524: Box 64, folder 259

525: Box 65, folder 268

526: Box 65, folder 268

527: Box 65, folder 268

528: Box 65, folders 269-270

529: Box 74, folder 427

530: Box 73, folder 378

531: Box 73, folder 378

532: Box 73, folder 378

533: Box 73, folder 378

534: Box 73, folder 379

535: Box 73, folder 379

536: Box 85, folder 650

537: Box 85, folder 650

538: Box 25, folder 570a

539: Box 73, folder 380

540: Box 73, folder 381

541: Box 73, folder 382

542: Box 75, folder 457

543: Box 75, folder 458

544: Box 88, folder 699

545: Box 88, folder 699

546: Box 75, folder 460

547: Box 82, folder 634

548: Box 82, folder 634

549: Box 82, folder 634

550: Box 73, folder 383

551: Box 73, folder 384

552: Box 73, folder 385

553: Box 75, folder 461

554: Box 75, folder 461

555: Box 73, folder 389

556: Box 73, folder 390

557: Box 73, folder 391

558: Box 73, folder 391

559: Box 73, folder 391

560: Box 73, folder 391

JWJ Zan 2 + 932F: Box 79, folder 581

JWJ Zan J632 + 1.1: Box 63, folder 242

JWJ Zan J632 + 1.2: Box 79, folder 581

JWJ Zan J632 + 2 5.1: Box 122, folders 1075-1092

JWJ Zan J632 + 2 5.2: Box 123, folders 1093-1098

JWJ Zan J632 + 2 5.3: Box 72, folders 358-360

JWJ Zan J632 + N1: Box 138, folder 1151

JWJ Zan J632 + S1: Box 120, folder 1066

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 2:1-2: Box 50, folder 120 and BSD, folder 1067

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 2.1: Box 51, folder 122

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 2.2: Box 52, folders 123-137

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 3.0: Box 54, folders 149-152

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 4:2: Box 57, folders 168-176

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 4:3: Box 58, folders 177-185

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 4:4: Box 66, folders 271-279

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 5.1: Box 61, folders 221-229

JWJ Zan J632 + S1 5.2: Box 62, folders 230-239

JWJ Zan J632 + Z1: Box 100, folders 827-834

JWJ Zan J632 + Z2: Box 139, folder 1152

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 1.1: Box 137, folder 1148

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 1.2: Box 136, folder 1146

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 2.1: Box 135, folder 1145

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 2.2: Box 136, folder 1147

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 3: Box 127, folder 1114

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 4.1: Box 137, folder 1150

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 4.2: Box 130, folder 1123

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 4.3: Box 130, folder 1124

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc1 4.4: Box 130, folder 1124

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 1.1: Box 126, folder 1110

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 1.2: Box 135, folder 1144

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 1.3: Box 126, folder 1111

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 2.1: Box 126, folder 1112

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 2.2: Box 132, folder 1133

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 2.3: Box 128, folder 1115

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 2.4: Box 128, folder 1116

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 3.1: Box 132, folder 1134

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 3.2: Box 129, folder 1117

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 3.3: Box 131, folder 1127

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 3.5: Box 131, folders 1128-1129

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.1: Box 134, folder 1143

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.2: Box 134, folder 1141

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.3: Box 130, folder 1125

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.4: Box 130, folder 1126

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.5: Box 130, folder 1122

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.6: Box 129, folder 1118

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 4.7: Box 131, folder 1130

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 5.1: Box 127, folder 1113

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 5.2: Box 130, folder 1121

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 5.3: Box 137, folder 1149

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 5.4: Box 129, folder 1119

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 130, folder 1120

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 132, folder 1131

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 132, folder 1132

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 133, folders 1137-1138

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 134, folder 1139

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 134, folder 1140

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 6: Box 134, folder 1142

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 7: Box 124, folder 1100

JWJ Zan J632 + Zc2 7.2: Box 133, folders 1135-1136
Appendix B: Select Subject Guide to the Correspondence The abbreviations "JWJ," "GNJ," and "FC" refer to the subseries James Weldon Johnson, Grace Nail Johnson, and Family Correspondence within the Correspondence Series.

Africans, proposal for education in America See: Azikiwe, Nnamdi (JWJ)
Aldridge, Ira, financial situation of his family See: Robinson, Bill ("Bojangles") (JWJ)
Aldridge, Ira, memorial to (1928-30) See: American Shakespeare Foundation (JWJ)
Along This Way, by James Weldon Johnson See: Viking Press (JWJ)
White, Walter (1933) (JWJ)
Along This Way, by James Weldon Johnson, Jackson- ville reaction to See: Phillips, William E.W. (JWJ)
Along This Way, by James Weldon Johnson, Joel E. Spingarn's reaction to parts of book See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
Along This Way, by James Weldon Johnson, the title of See: Embree, Edwin R. (JWJ)
Amenia Conference (1916) See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
Amenia Conference (1933) See: DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
American Bar Association, discrimination against blacks See: Adams, Elbridge L. (JWJ)
American Fund for Public Service, financial aid to N.A.A.C.P. See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ)
Gannett, Lewis (JWJ)
N.A.A.C.P. - National Office (JWJ)
White, Walter (1932-38) (JWJ)
American League Against War and Fascism See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ)
American Missionary Association See: Brownlee, Fred L. (JWJ)
American Missionary Association, relationship to Palmer Memorial Institute See: Brown, Charlotte Hawkins (JWJ)
American Writers Against Lynching See: White, Walter (1933) (JWJ)
Anderson, Marian, refusal by Daughters of the American Revolution to let sing at Constitution Hall See: Van Vechten, Carl (1939) (GNJ)
Armed forces, World War I, training of black officers See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
Art, philanthropy and black artists See: Julius Rosenwald Fund (JWJ)
Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, fund raising drive (1936) See: Taylor, A.A. (JWJ)
Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, work of See: Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (JWJ)
Woodson, Carter G. (JWJ)
Atlanta University, board of trustees See: Reed, Florence M. (JWJ)
Atlanta University, James Weldon Johnson's candidacy for the presidency of (1936) See: Gordon, Asa H. (JWJ)
Pickens, William (JWJ)
Wesley, Charles H. (JWJ)
Atlanta University, the presidency of (1936) See: Alexander, Will W. (JWJ)
Banks, W. Rutherford (JWJ)
Dillard, James H. (JWJ)
Gordon, Asa H. (JWJ)
Martin, Eugene M. (JWJ)
Sage, Dean (JWJ)
Wesley, Charles H. (JWJ)
Wright, Richard R. Sr. (JWJ)
Atlanta University, the presidency of and affiliation with Morehouse College and Spelman College (1929) See: Adams, Myron W. (JWJ)
Alexander, Will W. (JWJ)
Banks, W. Rutherford (JWJ)
Clement, Rufus E. (JWJ)
Coffin, Henry Sloane (JWJ) Hershaw, L.M. (JWJ)
Hope, John (JWJ)
Matthews, William B. (JWJ)
Ruml, Beardsley (JWJ)
Sage, Dean (JWJ)
Webster, Edgar H. (JWJ)
Wilson, Butler (JWJ)
Atlanta University, white faculty and staff of See: Shipman, Frank R. (JWJ)
The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, by James Weldon Johnson See: Knopf, Alfred A. (JWJ)
Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. (JWJ)
Knopf, Blanche W. (JWJ)
Matthews, Brander (JWJ)
Sherman, French and Co. (JWJ)
Towns, George A. (JWJ)
New American Library (GNJ)
Bahamas, blacks in See: JWJ - Stephen A. Dillet to (FC)
Barthe, Richmond, proposed memorial for James Weldon Johnson See: Van Vechten, Carl (1938-44) (GNJ)
White, Walter (GNJ)
Black Manhattan, by James Weldon Johnson See: Knopf, Alfred A. (JWJ)
Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. (JWJ)
Knopf, Blanche W. (JWJ)
Black Nationalism See: National Movement for the Establishment of a 49th State (JWJ)
The Book of American Negro Poetry, by James Weldon Johnson See: Harcourt, Brace and Co. (JWJ)
Randolph, Richetta G. (1930) (JWJ)
Book of American Negro Spirituals, by James Weldon Johnson See: Viking Press folders (JWJ)
Braithwaite, William Stanley, financial situation of See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
White, Walter (1932) (JWJ)
Brookwood Labor School See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ)
Brookwood Labor School (JWJ)
Broun, Heywood, candidacy for the United States Congress (1930) See: Broun, Heywood (JWJ)
White, Walter (1930-31) (JWJ)
Brown, John, proposed memorial tablet at Harper's Ferry (1932) See: White, Walter (1932)
Brown, Sterling See: Spencer, Anne (JWJ)
Brown, Sterling, Southern Road, James Weldon Johnson's introduction to See: Brown, Sterling (JWJ)
Harcourt, Brace and Co. (JWJ)
Bunche, Ralph, tribute to (1972) See: Robinson, Jackie (GNJ)
Burrus, James Dallas, some notes on his life as told by Mary K. Spence See: Bowles, Luanna J. (JWJ)
Cake-walk, the execution of See: Gannett, Lewis (JWJ)
Cole, Bob See: Norman, Dora Cole (JWJ)
Commission on Interracial Cooperation See: Eleazer, R.B. (JWJ)
Communist Party See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ) McKay, Claude (JWJ)
Pickens, William (JWJ) White, Walter (1932) (JWJ)
Communist Party, blacks and See: McKay, Claude (JWJ)
Cook, Will Marion, proposal to found a black school of music See: Graves, William C. (JWJ)
The Crisis See: DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
White, Walter (1934) (JWJ)
The Crisis, advertisements for James Weldon Johnson's books in See: Harcourt, Brace and Co. (JWJ)
D___ (James Weldon Johnson's close friend) See: Brawley, Benjamin (JWJ)
Randolph, Richetta G. (1930) (JWJ)
Wetmore, J. Douglas (JWJ)
Daughters of the American Revolution, refusal to let Marian Anderson sing in Constitution Hall See: Van Vechten, Carl (1939) (GNJ)
Dett, R. Nathaniel, Rosenwald fellowship for See: Dett, R. Nathaniel (JWJ)
Julius Rosenwald Fund (JWJ)
Dictionary of American Biography, blacks in See: Woodson, Carter G. (JWJ)
Dillet, Stephen (grandfather of James Weldon Johnson) See: JWJ - Stephen A. Dillet to (FC)
Discrimination in schools See: White, Walter (1930-31) (JWJ)
District of Columbia, black schools in See: Moore, Fred R. (JWJ)
Dodson, Owen, early poetry reading contests See: Viking Press - Marshall Best (1930-33)
DuBois, William E.B., as editor of The Crisis See: White, Walter (1934) (JWJ)
DuBois, William E.B., campaign for United States Senate See: Harrington, Oliver (GNJ)
DuBois, William E.B., indictment for failure to register as an agent of a foreign principle See: DuBois, William E.B. (GNJ)
DuBois, William E.B., memorial to, Great Barrington, Massachusetts See: W.E.B. DuBois Memorial Committee (GNJ)
DuBois, William E.B., at Niagra Movement Conference See: Daniel, A. Mercer (JWJ)
DuBois, William E.B., proposed gift of his manuscripts to the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection See: Van Vechten, Carl (1946) (GNJ)
DuBois, William E.B., reaction to his views on segregation See: Viking Press - Marshall Best (JWJ)
White, Walter (1934) (JWJ)
DuBois, William E.B., resignation from N.A.A.C.P. (1934) See: N.A.A.C.P. - National Office (JWJ)
DuBois Prize See: DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
Gannett, Lewis (JWJ)
LaFarge, Oliver (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, accident causing death of See: Hays, Arthur Garfield (GNJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, appointment as National Organizer of N.A.A.C.P. See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, Atlanta University days, [Rev. John H.?] Hicks ("Dean Hicks") See: Scoville, William L. (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, awarded Haitian decoration "Honneur et Mérite" See: Blanchet, M. Albert
Johnson, James Weldon, classes at New York University See: New York University (JWJ)
Payne, E. George (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, consular service See: Bryan, William Jennings (JWJ)
Carr, Wilbur J. (JWJ)
Consular letters (JWJ)
Knox, P.C. (JWJ)
Leonard, H.H. (JWJ)
Matthews, Brander (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - Grace Nail Johnson to (FC)
Johnson, James Weldon, at Fisk University [Note: material related to Fisk University is located throughout the correspondence. ] See: Johnson, Charles S. (JWJ)
Jones, Thomas E. (JWJ)
Jones, Mrs. Thomas E. (GNJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, funds for participation in Oxford Conference See: Embree, Edwin R. (JWJ)
White, George (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, health of See: Wright, Louis T. (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, leave of absence from N.A.A.C.P. (1929) See: Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
James Weldon Johnson, lecture folder See: Viking Press - Marshall Best (1930-33) (JWJ)
Encyclopedia of the Negro See: DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
Logan, Rayford (JWJ)
Stokes, Anson Phelps (JWJ)
Woodson, Carter G. (JWJ)
Ethiopia, invasion by Italy, Afro-American reaction to See: Jones, William N. (JWJ)
"Fifty Years", by James Weldon Johnson See: Stokes, Anson Phelps (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (undated) (FC)
Fisk University, James Weldon Johnson at [Note: material related to Fisk University is located throughout the correspondence. ] See: Johnson, Charles S. (JWJ)
Jones, Thomas E. (JWJ)
Jones, Mrs. Thomas E. (GNJ)
Fisk University, use of James Weldon Johnson's Negro Americans, What Now? for fund raising See: Viking Press - Marshall Best (1934-68) (JWJ)
Friends of Haiti Society See: White, Walter (1938) (JWJ)
Garland Fund See: American Fund for Public Service
God's Trombones, by James Weldon Johnson See: Lambert, Constant (JWJ)
Viking Press (JWJ)
God's Trombones, by James Weldon Johnson, the title of See: Spencer, Anne (JWJ)
Spingarn, Arthur B. (JWJ)
Spingarn, Joel E. (JWJ)
Goyescas, by Fernando Periquet, English Libretto by James Weldon Johnson See: Periquet, Fernando (JWJ)
Gruening, Ernest, recommendation as United States ambassador to Haiti See: White, Walter (1932) (JWJ)
Haiti See: Moton, Robert Russa (JWJ)
White, Walter (1934) (JWJ)
White, Walter (1938) (JWJ)
Haiti, proposed United States ambassador to (1932) See: White, Walter (1932) (JWJ)
Haiti, United States minister to (1915) See: DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
Haiti, United States occupation of and James Weldon Johnson's articles about conditions of See: Carr, Wilbur J. (JWJ)
Gruening, Ernest H. (JWJ)
Haiti (JWJ)
Holly, Alonzo P.B. (JWJ)
McCormick, Mendill (JWJ)
Metropolitan Magazine (JWJ)
Ovington, Mary White (JWJ)
Schoenrich, Otto (JWJ)
Harlem Hospital See: White, Walter (1933) (JWJ)
Harlem Renaissance, James Weldon Johnson's comments on (1933) See: West, Dorothy (JWJ)
Harlem riots, reaction to (1935) See: White, Walter (1935) (JWJ)
Hayden, Robert, publication of poems by See: Knopf, Alfred A. (JWJ)
Viking Press - Marshall Best (JWJ)
Hicks, [Rev. John H.], (dean, Atlanta University) See: Scoville, William L. (JWJ)
Hoover, Herbert, nomination by Republican Party (1932) See: Ickes, Harold L. (JWJ)
Hope, John, provisions for the widow of See: Bethune, Mary McLeod (JWJ)
Lampkin, Daisy E. (JWJ)
Hope, John See: Atlanta University, the presidency of and Affiliation with Morehouse College and Spelman College (1929)]
Houston, Charles H., employment by the N.A.A.C.P. See: White, Walter (1934) (JWJ)
Howard University See: Napier, James C. (JWJ)
Hughes, Charles Evans, campaign for the presidency (1916) See: Hughes, Charles Evans (sec.) (JWJ)
Hughes, Langston, application for fellowship from Guggenheim Foundation See: Guggenheim Foundation (JWJ)
Hurston, Zora Neale, proposed experimental theatre at Fisk University See: Jones, Thomas E. (JWJ)
Hurston, Zora Neale, proposed study at Yale School of Drama See: Jones, Thomas E. (JWJ)
Imperialiam See: Haiti, United States occupation of and James Weldon Johnson's articles about the conditions of
Imperialiam, Italy's invasion of Ethiopia, Afro-American reaction to See: Jones, William N. (JWJ)
Institute of Pacific Relations, Kyoto Conference (1929) See: Institute of Pacific Relations (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (1929) (FC)
Institute of Race Relations See: Bryan, Helen R. (JWJ)
Johnson, Charles S. (JWJ)
International Labor Defense See: Pickens, William (JWJ)
See also: Scottsboro case
James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection, Yale University See: James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection (GNJ)
Van Vechten, Carl (1945-64) (GNJ)
James Weldon Johnson Memorial Committee See: Randolph, Richetta G. (GNJ)
Van Vechten, Carl (1939) (GNJ)
White, Walter (GNJ)
Johnson, James (father of James Weldon Johnson) the estate of See: L'Engle, E.J. (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - Agnes M. Edwards to (FC)
JWJ - Grace Nail Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - Helen Louise Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - J. Rosamond Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - John E. Nail to (FC)
Johnson, James Weldon, lyrics by See: American Guild of Authors and Composers (JWJ)
Edward B. Marks Music Co. (JWJ)
G. Ricordi and Co., Inc. (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (1914-18) (FC)
GNJ - J. Rosamond Johnson to (FC)
JWJ - Grace Nail Johnson to (1914-18) (FC)
JWJ - J. Rosamond Johnson to (FC)
JRJ - royalty statements (FC)
Johnson, James Weldon, proposed as Republican candidate for United States House of Representatives See: Koening, Samuel S. (JWJ)
Travis, Hamilton J. (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, resignation of secretaryship of N.A.A.C.P. See: N.A.A.C.P. - National Office (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, speaking engagements See: Adult Education Council of Chicago (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, "To What Extent Do You Think American Negroes Should Interest Themselves in Abyssinia?" draft and copy of JWJ's comments on question See: Jones, William N. (JWJ)
Johnson, James Weldon, withdrawl of appointment to Labor Policy Board of Work Projects Administration See: Baker, Jacob (JWJ)
White, Walter (1935) (JWJ)
Krehbiel, H.E., controversy with James Weldon Johnson See: Letters to the Editor (JWJ)
Peacock, Roscoe (JWJ)
Randolph, Richetta G. (JWJ)
Kyoto Conference (1929) See: Institute of Pacific Relations (JWJ)
GNJ - James Weldon Johnson to (1929) (JWJ)
Labor movements, Brookwood Labor School See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ)
Brookwood Labor School (JWJ)
Labor movements, International Labor Defense See: Pickens, William (JWJ)
See also: Scottsboro case
Labor unions, blacks and See: American Fund for Public Service (JWJ)
Randolph, Asa Philip (JWJ)
League of Negro Writers See: McKay, Claude (JWJ)
Liberia, reaction to Firestone's relationship with See: Graves, Anna Melissa (JWJ)
"Lift Every Voice and Sing", by James Weldon Johnson and J. Rosamond Johnson See: Edward B. Marks Music Co. (JWJ)
Scott, Emmett J. (JWJ)
Lynching and anti-lynching legislation See: Alexander, Will W. (JWJ)
DuBois, William E.B. (JWJ)
Hamilton, John D. (JWJ)
Randolph, Richetta G. (1921-29) (JWJ)
Roosevelt, Franklin D. (JWJ)

Processing Information

The James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers were largely catalogued in 1973 and in 2008-2009. During the 1970s priority was given to correspondence and writings. As a result, other material, such as photographs, personal papers, objects, and artwork, were left unprocessed. Since the original processing in 1973, the library also acquired more material, consisting of correspondence, writings, personal papers, and photographs, which until 2008-2009 was unprocessed.

1970s

In 1973 the Correspondence (Series I), Writings (Series II), and Scrapbooks (Series V) were catalogued. The Correspondence was organized into several series and arranged alphabetically. A finding aid was created under the title: James Weldon Johnson Papers (Correspondence) using a typewriter. In 2007 the finding aid was then converted to an electronic file by means of scanning and Optical Character Recognition software and encoded in Encoded Archival Description. In 1973 the Writings were loosely organized into genres and then arranged alphabetically. Individual catalogue cards were created for each manuscript and each manuscript was assigned a specific call number. As a group, the manuscripts were under the title: James Weldon Johnson Manuscripts (JWJ MSS Johnson). Scrapbooks were individually catalogued and assigned call numbers. Individual catalogue cards were created, which were eventually transferred into Yale University’s online catalogue, ORBIS.

1990s

A group of unprocessed correspondence was found in 1999. This material was integrated with existing Correspondence (Series I).

2000s

In 2008-2009 the finding aid was further updated and a number of format changes were necessary to present the structure of the finding aid in accordance with current practice.

At this time processed and unprocessed material were integrated into one finding aid with a new title and a new call number. The title of the Papers was changed in order to reflect the entire contents of the collection from James Weldon Johnson Papers (Correspondence) to James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers. Previously processed material was brought together, including the James Weldon Johnson Papers (Correspondence), the James Weldon Johnson Manuscripts (JWJ Mss Johnson), and scrapbooks. The new call number replaces the old, separate call number formally used for the Writings and Scrapbooks; an index to these old call numbers is provided in Appendix A.

Uncatalogued material consisted of accessions acquired between 2000 and 2008 (such as correspondence, writings, personal papers, and photographs) as well as material left uncatalogued from earlier accessions (such as photographs, objects, and artwork). The uncatalogued material was integrated, when appropriate, into the existing correspondence and writings.

In 2008-2009 the following series were added: Consular Service (Series III), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (Series IV), Personal Papers (Series V), Printed Material (Series VI), Legal and Financial Records (Series VII), Family Papers (Series VIII), Photographs (Series IX), Art/Objects (Series X), and Audiovisual Material (Series XI).

Descriptions from Correspondence (Series I) and Writings (Series II) were largely repurposed although these series also underwent changes. Correspondence and writings acquired by the Beinecke Library between 2000 and 2009 were integrated into existing Correspondence (Series I) and Writings (Series II). The subseries "Third-Party Correspondence", which provided cross-references to letters physically contained elsewhere in the James Weldon Johnson Correspondence, Grace Nail Johnson Correspondence, and Family Correspondence sub-series, was deleted and replaced with notes where the material is physically situated in the Correspondence Series. The Writings (Series II) contain descriptive information transcribed from catalogue cards into the finding aid. For the most part the writings are organized as they were in 1973 with only small changes to the names of subseries (for example, “Lectures” was changed to “Teaching Materials”). The catalogued scrapbooks are now a subseries in Personal Papers (Series VIII).
Title
Guide to the James Weldon Johnson and Grace Nail Johnson Papers
Author
by George P. Cunningham and H. Dean
Date
July 1973
Language of description
Finding aid written in English

Revision Statements

  • 2014: [Revision description not specified]
  • 2010-02-10: Transformed with yale.addEadidUrl.xsl. Adds @url with handle for finding aid. Overwrites @url if already present.
  • 2007-08-13: beinecke.jwj.xml converted for compliance with Yale EAD Best Practice Guidelines with brbl-migrate-01.xsl (mr2007-08-13).
  • 2007-03-08: PUBLIC "-//Yale University::Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library//TEXT (US::CtYBR::::[JAMES WELDON JOHNSON PAPERS (CORRESPONDENCE) ])//EN" "jwj.xml" converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by v1to02.xsl (sy2003-10-15).

Repository Details

Part of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Repository

Contact:
P. O. Box 208330
New Haven CT 06520-8330 US
(203) 432-2977