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Thomas Davis Day papers

 Collection
Call Number: MS 1674

Scope and Contents

The Thomas Davis Day Papers consist of fifteen letterbooks, which range in date from 1839 to 1871, a book recounting the history of the Day family, The Journals of Thomas Davis Day, written by Stanley M. Rowe, Jr. in 1990, and a scrapbook. The letterbooks contain Day's personal and business correspondence. Letters from the 1840s to his mother and other family members chiefly concern family matters and his interest in family history. They also describe daily life in New Orleans, including yellow fever epidemics, and river boat travel on the Mississippi. Business letters pertain to Day's work for Slark, Day, and Stauffer, including descriptions of business travel to New York and Washington, D. C. Following Day's relocation to St. Louis in 1846, the letters provide details of his business and financial activities in the 1840s and 1850s. There is also some discussion of Day's pro-slavery views and of national politics during the years leading up to the Civil War. There are no entries, however, between 1860 and 1864. After the war, Day's letters are largely concerned with the dissolution of his partnership with Shapleigh, his subsequent financial difficulties, and the Day family's strained relationship with James Ingersoll Day over the latter's dishonest financial dealings and mistreatment of family members. Thomas Davis Day, merchant of New Orleans, St. Louis, and New York City, was born in Ohio in 1820. At age sixteen he moved to New Orleans to work for his brother, James Ingersoll Day (1812-1896), who was a partner in the hardware firm of Slark, Day, and Stauffer. In 1846, Thomas Davis Day moved to St. Louis and with Augustus F. Shapleigh formed a hardware business, Shapleigh and Day. He married Frances Helm of Natchez, Mississippi, in 1859. After the Civil War, Day experienced business troubles and dissolved his partnership with Shapleigh. He relocated to New York City in 1865 and founded the hardware firm of Day and Haley, which went into bankruptcy in 1871. Day died in 1896.

Dates

  • 1837-1990
  • Majority of material found within 1837 - 1871

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.The letterbook volumes in boxes 1 to 3 of the original accession are available on microfilm. Patrons must use HM 235 instead of the originals.The scrapbook in box 1 of Accession 2004-M-082 requires the assistance of staff of Manuscripts and Archives because of the fragility of the fold-out inserts, especially the maps.

Existence and Location of Copies

Letterbooks of Thomas Davis Day are available on microfilm (5 reels, 35mm.) from Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library, at cost. Order no. HM 235.

Conditions Governing Use

Unpublished materials authored or otherwise produced by Thomas Davis Day and materials donated by Snowden Rowe are in the public domain. Copyright for unpublished materials authored or otherwise produced by Stanley M. Rowe, Jr. was transferred to Yale University. These materials may be used for non-commercial purposes without seeking permission from Yale University as the copyright holder. For other uses of these materials, please contact mssa.assist@yale.edu. Copyright status for other collection materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Stanley M. Rowe, Jr., 1994; gift of Snowden Rowe, 2004.

Arrangement

15 volumes of letterbooks, arranged in rough chronological order.

Extent

1.75 Linear Feet (5 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

https://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.1674

Overview

The Thomas Davis Day Papers consist of fifteen letterbooks, which range in date from 1839 to 1871, a book recounting the history of the Day family, The Journals of Thomas Davis Day, written by Stanley M. Rowe, Jr. in 1990, and a scrapbook. The letterbooks contain Day's personal and business correspondence. Letters from the 1840s to his mother and other family members chiefly concern family matters and his interest in family history. They also describe daily life in New Orleans, including yellow fever epidemics, and river boat travel on the Mississippi. Business letters pertain to Day's work for Slark, Day, and Stauffer, including descriptions of business travel to New York and Washington, D. C. Following Day's relocation to St. Louis in 1846, the letters provide details of his business and financial activities in the 1840s and 1850s. There is also some discussion of Day's pro-slavery views and of national politics during the years leading up to the Civil War. There are no entries, however, between 1860 and 1864. After the war, Day's letters are largely concerned with the dissolution of his partnership with Shapleigh, his subsequent financial difficulties, and the Day family's strained relationship with James Ingersoll Day over the latter's dishonest financial dealings and mistreatment of family members. Thomas Davis Day, merchant of New Orleans, St. Louis, and New York City, was born in Ohio in 1820. At age sixteen he moved to New Orleans to work for his brother, James Ingersoll Day (1812-1896), who was a partner in the hardware firm of Slark, Day, and Stauffer. In 1846, Thomas Davis Day moved to St. Louis and with Augustus F. Shapleigh formed a hardware business, Shapleigh and Day. He married Frances Helm of Natchez, Mississippi, in 1859. After the Civil War, Day experienced business troubles and dissolved his partnership with Shapleigh. He relocated to New York City in 1865 and founded the hardware firm of Day and Haley, which went into bankruptcy in 1871. Day died in 1896.

Biographical / Historical

Thomas Davis Day, merchant of New Orleans, St. Louis, and New York City, was born in Ohio in 1820. At age sixteen he moved to New Orleans to work for his brother, James Ingersoll Day (1812-1896), who was a partner in the hardware firm of Slark, Day, and Stauffer. In 1846, Thomas Davis Day moved to St. Louis and with Augustus F. Shapleigh formed a hardware business, Shapleigh and Day. He married Frances Helm of Natchez, Mississippi, in 1859. After the Civil War, Day experienced business troubles and dissolved his partnership with Shapleigh. He relocated to New York City in 1865 and founded the hardware firm of Day and Haley, which went into bankruptcy in 1871. Day died in 1896.
Title
Guide to the Thomas Davis Day Papers
Status
Under Revision
Author
compiled by Elizabeth Pauk
Date
August 1995
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Manuscripts and Archives Repository

Contact:
Yale University Library
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven CT 06520-8240 US
(203) 432-1735
(203) 432-7441 (Fax)

Location

Sterling Memorial Library
Room 147
120 High Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours