Skip to main content

Edwin Richard Weinerman papers

 Collection
Call Number: MS 692

Scope and Contents

Correspondence, consultations, surveys, writings, printed material, and other papers of Edwin Richard Weinerman. Material primarily reflects Weinerman's interest in public health and deals with his activities both as a consultant and administrator with various public and private health careorganizations, including the U. S. Public Health Service, Permanente Health Plan, American Public Health Association, and the Yale-New Haven Hospital. A significant part of the collection also relates to Weinerman's social and political activities, especially his concern over dangers of air pollution, nuclear warfare and radiation poisoning, and his opposition to the House Committee on Un-American Activities and the Levering Act which required loyalty oaths as a condition for medical licensure. The papers also include notebooks and course papers from his own studies at Harvard and New York University (1945-1948) as well as teaching materials from the University of California. His professional program is documented in grant applications (1963-1972), two speeches and letters written in preparation for his trip abroad in 1970, collected works (articles), and curriculum vitae. Also in the papers are letters of condolence and a transcript and audio tapes of the memorial service at Yale University following his death in 1970. These papers form part of the Contemporary Medical Care and Health Policy Collection.

Dates

  • 1908-1970

Creator

Language

English

Conditions Governing Access

Boxes 93-98 are restricted until January 1, 2046, due to repository requirements.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright status for collection materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Gift of Robert A. Weinerman, 1973, and transfers from the Epidemiology and Public Health Department, 1977 and the Yale Medical Library, 1982.

Arrangement

Arranged in five series: I. Correspondence, 1945-1970. II. Consultations, Projects, and Professional Assignments, 1943-1970. III. Medical, Political, and Social Activities and Organizations. IV. Addresses and Writings, 1939-1940, 1942, 1945-1946, 1948-1969, n.d. V. Personal Papers and Miscellaneous.

Extent

59.5 Linear Feet (100 boxes)

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.0692

Overview

Correspondence, consultations, surveys, writings, printed material, and other papers of Edwin Richard Weinerman. Material primarily reflects Weinerman's interest in public health and deals with his activities both as a consultant and administrator with various public and private health careorganizations, including the U. S. Public Health Service, Permanente Health Plan, American Public Health Association, and the Yale-New Haven Hospital. A significant part of the collection also relates to Weinerman's social and political activities, especially his concern over dangers of air pollution, nuclear warfare and radiation poisoning, and his opposition to the House Committee on Un-American Activities and the Levering Act which required loyalty oaths as a condition for medical licensure. The papers also include notebooks and course papers from his own studies at Harvard and New York University (1945-1948) as well as teaching materials from the University of California. His professional program is documented in grant applications (1963-1972), two speeches and letters written in preparation for his trip abroad in 1970, collected works (articles), and curriculum vitae. Also in the papers are letters of condolence and a transcript and audio tapes of the memorial service at Yale University following his death in 1970. These papers form part of the Contemporary Medical Care and Health Policy Collection.

Biographical / Historical

Edwin Richard Weinerman was born on July 17, 1917 in Hartford, Connecticut. He attended Yale University, graduating with honors in 1938. He then entered Georgetown University School of Medicine, graduating magna cum laude in 1942. While a student at Georgetown in 1940, Weinerman married Shirley Basch.

After receiving his medical degree, Weinerman served as a Resident in Communicable Diseases at the Charles V. Chapin Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island and as Medical House Officer at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston.

Weinerman entered active military duty in 1943. From August, 1943 until March, 1944 he was a Resident in Internal Medicine at Drew Field Regional Hospital in Florida. He also served in Europe from April 1944 to October 1945 as the chief of a combat shock team with the United States Army 4th Auxillary Surgical Group. He was discharged from the Army in January of 1946.

After his discharge, Weinerman became Assistant Chief Medical Officer of the Health Services Division of the Farm Security Administration, planning and administering medical care programs for rural farm families. When this program was restricted in 1947, Weinerman left the FSA and, from March to September, became an Associate in Medical Care Administration in the Division of Public Health Methods of the United States Public Health Service. In this position, he consulted on medical care and public health programs including child health services and the health care aspects of universal military training.

In the fall of 1947, Weinerman entered the Harvard University School of Public Health with the support of a fellowship from the National Institute of Infantile Paralysis. He graduated magna cum laude in 1948.

After receiving his public health degree, Weinerman joined the faculty of the University of California School of Public Health. From the fall of 1948 to 1950, Weinerman was Associate Professor of Medical Economics and Head of the Division of Medical Care Administration. He taught both graduates and undergraduates, did research in medical economics, and consulted on medical care organization.

Weinerman left the University in 1950 during a controversy over faculty "loyalty oaths" and accepted a job with the Permanente (now Kaiser) Health Plan. He served as Medical Director of this prepaid group practice health plan in 1950 and 1951 and had overall direction of the medical care aspects of the program. But as a result of policy disagreements with the founder of the plan, Dr. Sidney R. Garfield, and its main sponsor, industrialist Henry J. Kaiser, Weinerman resigned in 1951.

To refresh his medical knowledge and skills after several years of administrative and academic work, Weinerman arranged for a special residency at the San Francisco Veteran's Administration Hospital in 1952-1953. He also began a private practice of internal medicine in El Cerrito, California, where he served until 1962. From 1955 to 1962, Weinerman also served as the Medical Director of the Herrick Memorial Hospital Clinics. In addition, he was the Physician-in-Charge of the Rheumatic Fever Clinic of the Contra Costa County Health Department from 1953 to 1962.

In 1962, Weinerman left private practice in California to become Director of Ambulatory Services at Yale-New Haven Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the Yale School of Medicine. He was promoted to full professor in 1965. He resigned as Director of Ambulatory Services in 1968 to become head of the section on Medical Care and Hospital Administration of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health in the School of Medicine. During his years at Yale, Weinerman concentrated on the reorganization and improvement of ambulatory services and did much to increase the efficiency of the emergency room and upgrade the quality of care. He also worked to improve relations between the Medical School and the surrounding community.

Weinerman was a frequent consultant on health care subjects and conducted numerous surveys and evaluations of health care plans, clinics, and hospitals and was an advocate of "social medicine." To Weinerman, this was a concept of medicine which included the study of the relationships between health and social and economic forces. He was particularly interested in the economics, organization, and quality of medical care and wanted to reorganize the haphazard American medical care system to provide adequate health care for all people. To achieve this goal, he supported prepaid group practice health programs, which he felt should incorporate five basic principles:

1) prepayment based on family coverage

2) group medical practice of physicians and auxiliary health workers

3) medical centers, coordinated in regional networks

4) preventive medicine

5) democratic control of policy

Weinerman also supported programs for national health systems like the Wagner-Murray-Dingell bill of the late 1940's.

Weinerman was interested in the organization of medical care in foreign countries as well as in America. He was the author of Social Medicine in Western Europe, a report of a survey made in 1950. He also made a survey of Eastern European health care in 1967 which he described in Social Medicine in Eastern Europe.

Weinerman's interests were not strictly limited to medicine. He was an impassioned defender of civil liberties and during the early 1950's he opposed "loyalty oaths" and other attempts to attach political tests as a condition for licensure or employment. He became an active opponent of the House Committee on Un-American Activities and was a member of the California Democratic Council. In addition, Weinerman was deeply concerned about the hazards of nuclear weapons and radiation and about air pollution and smog. He was also a vigorous opponent of the war in Vietnam.

In 1970, while on sabbatical, Weinerman and his wife were killed when a terrorist bomb destroyed the airplane that was taking them to Israel, They were beginning a survey of health care in Israel, New Zealand, and Japan. Weinerman was 52 years old.

The E. R. Weinerman Papers will be useful to researchers interested in the development of social medicine in the United States from the end of World War Two until 1970. This broad topic includes the development of prepaid group practice health plans, and other attempts to improve the economics and organization of health care. The correspondence, surveys, and other material in the Weinerman Papers reveal the gradual acceptance of many medical ideas that were once anathema to most American physicians.

The Weinerman Papers contain the surveys, studies, and plans of numerous group health programs in which Weinerman developed and tested his ideas. The Papers will also be useful to those interested in the organization of ambulatory and emergency room services, one of Weinerman's main concerns during his years at Yale. In addition there are materials relating to some of the social and political issues of the 1950s and 1960s. Of particular interest, because of its impact on Weinerman's own profession and career, is the material relating to the House Committee on Un-American Activities and his opposition to "loyalty oaths."

The Papers are divided into five series as follows:

I) Correspondence

II) Consultations, Projects, and Professional Assignments

III) Medical, Political, and Social Activities and Organizations

IV) Addresses and Writings

V) Personal Papers and Miscellaneous.

The first series, CORRESPONDENCE, contains letters to and from Weinerman and some memoranda. There is correspondence of both a personal and professional nature. Most of the correspondence, however, is concerned with health care topics. There is a large amount of correspondence dealing with the organization and administration of various health care plans. There is also correspondence about Weinerman's own health care surveys, projects, and writings. Other correspondence relates to the many health care organizations that Weinerman belonged to. Among the significant correspondents are: Harold Aaron (109 items), Herbert Kerman Abrams (115 items), Franz Alexander (3 items), Solomon Joseph Axelrod (48 items), George Baehr (21 items), Herrmann Ludwig Blumgart (35 items), Ernest Philip Boas (12 items), Morris Brand (50 items), Lester Breslow (36 items), Agnes W. Brewster (40 items), James Brindle (38 items), John M. Brum (57 items), Allan Macy Butler (21 items), Arthur Carstens (18 items), Martin Cherkasky (22 items), Dean Alexander Clark (25 items), Edwin F. Daily (26 items), Michael Marks Davis (53 items), Albert Deutsch (16 items), Caldwell B. Esselstyn (18 items), Isidore Sydney Falk (50 items), Leslie Alan Falk (164 items), Franz Goldmann (58 items), George Goldstein (24 items), John Black Grant (37 items), Sidney Matthew Greenberg (35 items), Ira Vaughan Hiscock (7 items), John Y. James (18 items), Edwin Pratt Jordan (15 items), Lorin Edgar Kerr (44 items), Nathan Kramer (15 items), Walter Jay Lear (34 items), Hugh Rodman Leavell (37 items), John Osborne McNeel (41 items), Frederick Dodge Mott (80 items), Jonas N. Muller (45 items), Herbert Notkin (52 items), Charles H. Percy (5 items), George St. J. Perrott (9 items), Abraham A. Ribicoff (11 items), Milton Irwin Roemer (105 items), Edward Saunders Rogers (51 items), René Sand (4 items), Cecil G. Sheps (68 items), Henry Ernest Sigerist (21 items), George A. Silver (55 items), Albert Waldo Snoke (56 items), Jeremiah Stamler (31 items), Milton Terris (115 items), Kerr Lachlan White (25 items), Charles Francis Wilinsky (25 items), Glenn Wilson. (173 items), Charles-Edward Amory Winslow (4 items), and Avram Yedidia (75 items).

The second series, CONSULTATIONS, PROJECTS, AND PROFESSIONAL ASSIGNMENTS, contains a wide variety of material relating to all facets of Weinerman's career as a physician, public health official, teacher, medical care consultant and administrator, and author. The material has been grouped by subject into twenty-eight sections corresponding to specific projects, assignments, or positions. These sections are arranged in a rough chronological order although there is considerable overlapping between some sections.

Some correspondence that was originally filed in this series has been removed and placed in the CORRESPONDENCE series. Appropriate cross-references have been made. Each of the twenty-eight sections that comprise Series II is briefly described below.

1) FARM SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

In 1946 and 1947, Weinerman was Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Health Services Division, of the FSA (later the Farmers Home Administration). The memoranda, notes, and papers in this section deal mainly with the establishment, organization, and administration of health care programs for rural farm families. This section also contains testimony in favor of a national health insurance bill and some articles and reports by Weinerman on FSA programs.

2) UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

From March until September of 1947, Weinerman was an Associate in Medical Care Administration in the Public Health Methods Division of the U.S.P.H.S. This section contains memoranda on various topics relating to public health. Also included is a program for universal military training drawn up by Weinerman for the President's Advisory Commission on Universal Training.

3) NEW YORK STATE TEMPORARY COMMISSION ON THE NEED FOR A STATE UNIVERSITY

In 1947 and 1948, Weinerman helped write a memorandum on medical education and Education for the Health Services for the Commission. These two papers and the final report of the Commission are included in this section.

4) BOSTON HEALTH SURVEY

In 1948, Weinerman assisted Ira V. Hiscock and Hugh R. Leavell in a study of health services in the city of Boston. Included in this section is Weinerman's "Report of a Survey of the Boston City Health Department" and draft copies of the completed survey.

5) COMMISSION ON THE ORGANIZATION OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT

In 1948, Weinerman assisted the Hoover Commission by surveying Federal hospital facilities in the San Francisco area. This section includes some correspondence with the Commission, surveys, some reports and booklets published by the Commission and Weinerman's "Area Surveys" [of San Francisco hospitals] co-authored with M. E. DeBakey and M. Lapham.

6) AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION, SUBCOMMITTEE ON MEDICAL CARE

In 1949, Weinerman was a Subcommittee consultant on medical care. Weinerman was the author of "Quality of Medical Care in a National Health Program" which was promulgated as an official statement of the Association. This section includes minutes of the Subcommittee's meetings, numerous drafts of the statement, and criticisms of the statement.

7) GROUP HEALTH COOPERATIVE OF PUGET SOUND

Weinerman served as a consultant on the organization and provision of medical services for this group health plan. In 1950, he evaluated the plan and wrote The Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound: Report of a Study.

8) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

From 1948 to 1950, Weinerman was an Associate Professor of Medical Economics and Head of the Division of Medical Care Administration. This section contains notes for various courses taught by Weinerman at the School. Also filed in this section are letters and papers relating to the University of California loyalty oath controversy and Weinerman's resignation from the School of Public Health.

9) SOCIAL MEDICINE IN WESTERN EUROPE

In the summer of 1950, Weinerman travelled to England, Scotland, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, and France on a World Health Organization fellowship. His report on medical care programs in those countries was published in 1951 as Social Medicine in Western Europe.

10) PERMANENTE HEALTH PLAN

In 1950 and 1951, Weinerman was the Medical Director of the Permanente Health Plan. This section contains memoranda and papers dealing with the administration of the Plan. There are many memoranda from Weinerman suggesting ways to improve the structure and quality of Permanente. Disagreements over policy led to Weinerman's resignation as Medical Director in 1951 September. Material relating to the resignation is filed in this section including a memorandum from Weinerman of "Critical Observations of the Permanente Health Plan."

11) HAWAIIAN SUGAR AND PINEAPPLE WORKERS UNION SURVEY

In 1951 December and 1952 January, Weinerman conducted a survey of medical care plans and facilities in the Hawaiian Islands available to members of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. This section includes correspondence relating to the study and Weinerman's report on "Medical Care in the Territory of Hawaii." The report triggered a harsh attack on Weinerman by "industry doctors" which is included in this section along with Weinerman's reply.

12) FAMILY HEALTH RECORD STUDY

In 1951 November, Weinerman and C. F. Muller and A. Waybur presented a report on their attempt to collect and evaluate day-by-day health information on several hundred families. This section includes their report, copies of the "health record" books kept by Weinerman's own family, and some comments on the study.

13) MULTIPHASIC HEALTH TESTS

In 1951, Weinerman organized and co-ordinated a program of multiphasic health tests for members of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union who belonged to the Permanente Health Plan. This section includes correspondence, minutes, notes, and papers on the lengthy planning of these tests, their organization, promotion, and administration.

14) SAN FRANCISCO LABOR COUNCIL SURVEY

Weinerman served as a medical consultant for the San Francisco Labor Council. In 1952, he surveyed the medical care available to members of the American Federation of Labor in San Francisco. Weinerman's report, Labor Plans for Health, is included in this section along with papers relating to the proposed establishment of a labor health center by the Council.

15) THE PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION ON THE HEALTH NEEDS OF THE NATION

In 1952, Weinerman was Consultant on Medical Group Practice to the Commission. This section includes summaries of panel discussions, and reports on group practice and general practice.

16) HERRICK MEMORIAL HOSPITAL CLINICS

From 1955 to 1962, Weinerman was the Medical Director of the Herrick Memorial Hospital Clinics in Berkeley. This section contains papers on the organization and administration of the Clinics. Also included is material relating to an application for a grant from the Public Health Service to study health maintenance for the aging in a hospital setting.

17) BERKELEY HEALTH PLANS

This section contains a wide variety of material relating to attempts by Weinerman and others to establish pre-paid group health plans in the Berkeley area in 1951, 1954, and 1961-1962.

18) UNITED MINE WORKERS OF AMERICA WELFARE AND RETIREMENT FUND SURVEY OF CLINICS

In 1959 October, Weinerman conducted a survey of three UMWA clinics in the Pittsburgh area. He concentrated on the quality of medical care available at the Russellton, Centerville, and Bellaire Clinics. This section includes Weinerman's report, some correspondence relating to the report, and background material and notes on the three clinics. Also included in this section is material on the denial of hospital privileges to some doctors on the Bellaire staff by the local medical society. There is also material on the re-evaluation of the Centerville Clinic by Weinerman in 1962.

19) MINERS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION SURVEY OF HOSPITALS

In 1960 and 1961, Weinerman conducted a survey of the hospitals that comprised the UMWA's Miners Memorial Hospital Association, He focused on the efficiency and quality of medical service being provided. This section includes Weinerman's report and the notes and materials he gathered in preparing it. Also included is correspondence relating to the report.

20) GROUP HEALTH ASSOCIATION.

In 1961, Weinerman appraised the organization and medical services of the Group Health Association of Washington, D. C. This section includes Weinerman's report and background material on GHA.

21) COMMUNITY HEALTH ASSOCIATION, SANTA ROSA

In 1961 and 1962, Weinerman served as Medical Consultant in the planning and organizing of this pre-paid, union sponsored, group practice program. This section contains correspondence, memoranda, and notes on the founding of CHA. Also included is an outline of Weinerman's "Standards for Control of Quality of Medical Care."

22) UNITED AUTOMOBILE WORKERS AND AMERICAN MOTORS CORPORATION In 1961, Weinerman served as a consultant on the reorganization of medical care plans for American Motors workers. This section includes correspondence and a copy of Weinerman's report on the medical care plans co-authored with A. Yedidia.

23) COMMUNITY HEALTH FOUNDATION, CLEVELAND

Beginning in 1961, Weinerman was involved in the creation and organization of the Community Health Foundation, a pre-paid group health center in Cleveland, Ohio. Weinerman was also involved in planning and supervising a family health maintenance demonstration project at the Foundation supported by a Public Health Service grant. This section contains correspondence relating to the establishment and administration of CHF and the funding and progress of the family health maintenance project. This section also includes many other memoranda, minutes, notes, and papers on the Community Health Foundation and the family health maintenance project. These include a history of CHF by A. Yedidia entitled "Pattern for a Medical Care Program" and copies of the applications for the grant to fund the family health maintenance project.

24) AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION GUIDE TO MEDICAL CARE ADMINISTRATION

Weinerman and other members of the Program Area Committee on Medical Care Administration of the APHA worked on a policy statement on medical care administration. This section contains several revised versions of the Committee's work.

25) YALE MEDICAL SCHOOL AND HOSPITAL/HILL NEIGHBORHOOD CORPORATION

In 1962, Weinerman accepted a joint appointment as Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the Yale University School of Medicine and as Director of Ambulatory Services at the Yale-New Haven Hospital (then known as Grace-New Haven Community Hospital). In 1965, Weinerman was promoted to full professor. In 1968, Weinerman resigned as Director of Ambulatory Services to become the full-time head of the section on Medical Care in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health. This section includes several reports by Weinerman on his programs and progress while he held the joint appointment. There is also material in this section on several conferences on ambulatory services organized by Weinerman. Memoranda and papers on the organization and administration of the Yale-New Haven Hospital Emergency Room and Clinics are also filed in this section along with papers relating to Weinerman's teaching and other duties. Also filed in this section are copies of applications by the Hill Neighborhood Corporation in collaboration with Yale for a grant to fund a comprehensive health services project.

26) SOCIAL MEDICINE IN EASTERN EUROPE

In the spring of 1967, Weinerman visited Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland on a Commonwealth Fund Faculty Travel Award to survey the organization of health services and the training of health personnel in Eastern European countries. This section includes some correspondence, a manuscript copy of Weinerman's report, and a printer's copy of the report used by the Harvard University Press.

27) MISCELLANEOUS CONSULTATIONS

This section includes Weinerman's proposals for a health center program for the ILWU Welfare Fund.

28) BACKGROUND MATERIAL FOR HEALTH SURVEY OF ISRAEL, NEW ZEALAND, AND JAPAN

In the beginning of 1970, Weinerman and his wife began a tour to survey health care in Israel, New Zealand, and Japan. This section contains an assortment of reprints, pamphlets, books, and other material that Weinerman used to prepare for his uncompleted survey trip.

The third series, MEDICAL, POLITICAL, AND SOCIAL ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS, contains both material relating specifically to Weinerman's career as a physician interested in social medicine and material reflecting his broader political and social concerns.

This series contains a wide variety of material issued by medical and public health organizations. These include the Alameda-Contra Costa Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, the Group Health Association of America, the Physicians Forum, and many others. This material, though varying from organization to organization, consists mainly of announcements, appeals, notices, and reports. There are also many newsletters, pamphlets, and other publications. Some correspondence, originally filed with this section, has been removed and filed in the CORRESPONDENCE series. This has been noted in the affected sections.

Of particular interest are papers dealing with the founding of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association. There are also papers relating to the development of the Group Health Association of America from its predecessors, the Cooperative Health Federation of America, the Group Health Federation of America, and the American Labor Health Association. In addition, there are papers on the Physician's Forum, Physicians for Social Responsibility, the

Medical Committee for Human Rights and other organizations that reflect Weinerman's concern with the political and social aspects of medicine.

Other material in this series reflects this concern in a broader context. Weinerman was involved in many activities and organizations besides those that related directly to his medical career. For example, Weinerman was a prime mover in the East Bay Committee for American Activities and the East Bay Community Forum that opposed the House Committee on Un-American Activities. This series contains pamphlets, letters, and statements by those organizations as well as numerous articles, advertisements, and newspaper clippings about the House Committee and McCarthyism.

Weinerman was also involved in organizations like the East Bay Physicians' Committee for Civil Liberties and the Federation for the Repeal of the Levering Act that organized against attempts to impose political tests as a condition for medical licensure or employment. This series also contains articles, newspaper clippings, and pamphlets on the loyalty oath controversy at the University of California in the early 1950s.

Also included in this third series is material on Weinerman's work with the California Democratic Council developing issues and platforms.

Another major concern of Weinerman's was nuclear weapons and radiation hazards. Weinerman was well informed on this subject, and worked to alert the public to the dangers of nuclear testing and fallout. This series contains an extensive file of articles, newspaper clippings, and pamphlets on this subject. Weinerman was also concerned about air pollution and smog. Series III contains material on these topics also.

The fourth series, ADDRESSES AND WRITINGS, consists of articles, papers, addresses, and talks that span Weinerman's career from his days as a medical student to his untimely death.

The series is arranged alphabetically by title of address or writing. Although the material varies from title to title it includes notes, early drafts, revisions, tearsheets, abstracts, and reprints. Some newspaper clippings and press releases are also filed with some titles. Additional material on some of the articles in this series is filed in Series II, CONSULTATIONS, PROJECTS, AND PROFESSIONAL ASSIGNMENTS. When this is so, it has been noted on the appropriate folder.

Some correspondence was originally filed with the addresses and writings in this series. This has been removed and placed in the CORRESPONDENCE series. This has been noted in the affected Sections.

Scripts for broadcasts made by Weinerman on health care topics over radio station KPFA, Berkeley, California and some articles on health care topics, evidently written by Weinerman for a union oriented press service, are filed at the end of the series. There is also an article on national health insurance by Weinerman's wife entitled, "The Pains of a New Idea."

The fifth series, PERSONAL PAPERS AND MISCELLANEOUS, contains a variety of biographical materials about Weinerman including an autobiographical sketch, curricula vitae, magazine and newspaper clippings, and photographs. This series also includes letters, papers, and other documents relating to Weinerman's medical licensure, his military service and his private medical practice. The series also includes many of Weinerman's travel expense reports and vouchers from his frequent travels. There are also numerous miscellaneous bills, invoices, and receipts.
Title
Guide to the Edwin Richard Weinerman Papers
Author
compiled by Andrew M. Patterson
Date
September 1974
Language of description
Finding aid written in English.

Repository Details

Part of the Manuscripts and Archives Repository

Contact:
Yale University Library
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven CT 06520-8240 US
(203) 432-1735
(203) 432-7441 (Fax)