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Islamic fundamentalist audio recordings collection

 Collection
Call Number: MS 1880

Scope and Contents

The collection consists of audio recordings (in Arabic) of sermons, lectures, speeches, recitations of the Qurʾān (Koran) and poetry, interviews, radio broadcasts, and conversations, pertaining to Islam, in particular the fundamentalist perspective, and the Arab world. Over 200 speakers, primarily clerics, from over a dozen countries in the Middle East, Indian subcontinent, and Africa, are represented, documenting the views of a range of Jihadi, reformist, and moderate Islamic religious leaders. Only a few of the speakers are identified, including Osama bin Laden. The topics covered are wide-ranging and include the Qurʾān, Islamic jurisprudence, religious obligations and practices, mujahideen, Jihad, religious instruction, women, marriage, divorce, roles and responsibilities of husbands and wives, youth, death, extremism, secularism, evangelical Christians, Jewish people, and events and conflicts in the regions represented. The recordings date primarily from the 1980s to 2000, although some date from as early as the 1960s. The recordings are comprised of commercially-produced releases, copies of commercially-produced releases, and amateur recordings. Associated materials consist of inserts and photocopies of cassette casings.

Dates

  • Circa 1965-2000

Conditions Governing Access

The materials are open for research.

Original audiovisual materials, as well as preservation and duplicating masters, may not be played.

The entire collection has been digitized. Researchers must use the digital copies instead of the originals. Researchers wishing to access the digital copies or obtain a copy for their personal use should contact Manuscripts and Archives.

Existence and Location of Copies

The collection is available in digital form through Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library.

Conditions Governing Use

Copyright status for collection materials is unknown. Transmission or reproduction of materials protected by U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.) beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Works not in the public domain cannot be commercially exploited without permission of the copyright owners. Responsibility for any use rests exclusively with the user.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

The materials were a gift of David B. Edwards, 2006 and 2008.

Arrangement

The collection is arranged by repository assigned tape number.

Extent

19.25 Linear Feet (1459 boxes)

Language of Materials

Arabic

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Orbis, the Yale University Library catalog

Persistent URL

http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.1880

Overview

The collection consists of audio recordings (in Arabic) of sermons, lectures, speeches, recitations of the Qurʾān (Koran) and poetry, interviews, radio broadcasts, and conversations, pertaining to Islam, in particular the fundamentalist perspective, and the Arab world. Over 200 speakers, primarily clerics, from over a dozen countries in the Middle East, Indian subcontinent, and Africa, are represented, documenting the views of a range of Jihadi, reformist, and moderate Islamic religious leaders. Only a few of the speakers are identified, including Osama bin Laden. The topics covered are wide-ranging and include the Qurʾān, Islamic jurisprudence, religious obligations and practices, mujahideen, Jihad, religious instruction, women, marriage, divorce, roles and responsibilities of husbands and wives, youth, death, extremism, secularism, evangelical Christians, Jewish people, and events and conflicts in the regions represented. The recordings date primarily from the 1980s to 2000, although some date from as early as the 1960s. The recordings are comprised of commercially-produced releases, copies of commercially-produced releases, and amateur recordings.

Custodial History

The recordings are thought to have originated in Osama bin Laden's compound in Kandahār, Afghanistan. Following the Taliban's evacuation from Kandahār on December 7, 2001, the audiocassettes were acquired by CNN. CNN transferred the materials to Williams College's Afghan Media Project, headed by anthropologist David Edwards, who later donated them to Yale University.

General

This collection was described and digitized through the generous support of the Arcadia Foundation.

Processing Information

Due to numbering anomalies and the separation of blank tapes from the collection, there are gaps in the box numbers.
Title
Guide to the Islamic Fundamentalist Audio Recordings Collection
Status
Under Revision
Author
compiled by Mary Caldera, Fawaz Alwash, and Khadija El-Hazimy
Date
August 2012
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description note
Finding aid written in English.

Part of the Manuscripts and Archives Repository

Contact:
Yale University Library
P.O. Box 208240
New Haven CT 06520-8240 US
(203) 432-1735
(203) 432-7441 (Fax)

Location

Sterling Memorial Library
Room 147
120 High Street
New Haven, CT 06511

Opening Hours