Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search results

Stereographs

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus
Scope Note: Refers to the most popular and common form of stereoscopic photographs, which are double photographs of the same image taken from two slightly different perspectives. Stereographs are distinctive among other stereoscopic photographs because they are photographic prints mounted on cards, while other types could be daguerreotypes, negatives, or unmounted prints. From 1856 they were produced with twin-lens cameras, creating a three dimensional effect when viewed through a stereoscope. Stereographs were especially popular during the Victorian period.

Found in 2 Collections and/or Records:

Victor F. Germack and Lori Shepard Germack Collection of Photographs of Indians of North America

 Collection
Call Number: WA Photos 483
Overview: This collection consists chiefly of photographic materials created circa 1850-1978 that depict American Indians, including informal and studio portraits, as well as photographs that show the natural and built environment of the American West. Images of the American West include views of cities and towns, mining and logging operations, railroads, and natural scenery.
Dates: circa 1850-1978, bulk 1860-1925

Carroll T. Hobart papers

 Collection
Call Number: WA MSS S-2396
Overview: The papers document Carroll T. Hobart's involvement in the Yellowstone Park Improvement Company and the Northern Pacific Railroad through correspondence, photographs, printed material, and documents. The correspondence consists mostly of Hobart's business correspondence. Principal correspondents include his wife Alice, his contractor brother Charles F. Hobart, and T. F. Oakes and Robert Harris of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The photographs include images of Yellowstone National Park by F....
Dates: 1871-1904