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Watercolors (paintings)

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus
Scope Note: Refers to two-dimensional works of art, usually on a paper support, to which pigment suspended in water is applied with a brush to create an image or design. Includes paintings using gouache, which is not technically watercolor paint.

Found in 970 Collections and/or Records:

1. India. The Caves of Elephanta near Bombay. March 1850., 1850 March

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Depicts naval officers drinking and dining in the Elephanta Caves, near present-day Mumbai. Porcher may have looked to models such as 'The Temple of Elephanta': line engraving by James Phillips after painting by James Wales, based on an original drawing by James Forbes (Published London, 1790). Porcher’s signature appears on the bottom left corner.
Dates: 1850 March

10. Hong Kong from the beach road, leading to the Happy Valley. December 9, 1852., 1852 December 9

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: This representation illustrates the fashion of British colonial modes of transport by the early 1850s. Chinese figures carry a palanquin, while a horse-drawn carriage also charges by. Happy Valley was the site of a British racecourse and a Protestant Cemetery (see watercolor “11”).
Dates: 1852 December 9

11. Hong Kong. Protestant cemetery in the Happy Valley. October 26, 1852., 1852 October 26

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: The Hong Kong Cemetery (also known as the Protestant Cemetery and the Colonial Cemetery) was opposite the oldest racecourse in Hong Kong in Happy Valley, and in the middle of a line of cemeteries that included the Roman Catholic cemetery (founded 1848) and later Islamic cemetery (1870). In 1853 (a year after this view), the captain and crew of the HMS Cleopatra erected a monument to Scottish trader and explorer Robert Burns, grandson of the poet, who was killed by pirates of the Tunku River...
Dates: 1852 October 26

12. Hong Kong. Chinese man of war junk mounting 27 Guns. Mandarin’s Flag (Blue button at the Fore). July 26, 1851., 1851 July 26

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Since the Song Dynasty, ocean-going junks of this size made trips to Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean.
Dates: 1851 July 26

14. Hong Kong. HMS Cleopatra lying off Jardine’s establishment. November 22, 1852., 1852 November 22

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Jardine & Matheson Co. were the most powerful opium merchants in Hong Kong. They founded their company in 1832, grew rapidly by exporting tea and silk to England, and by smuggling opium. They purchased land in the Causeway area when Britain acquired Hong Kong after the Treaty of Nanking, at the conclusion of the first opium war. Porcher’s journal describes the “patent slip” at Jardine’s Establishment, where “ships of about 500 tons… can be hauled up” and repaired (6). A drawing of the...
Dates: 1852 November 22

17. Joss house built in Tai-Pin-Shan in 1851. August 7, 1852., 1852 August 7

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: “Joss House” was the derogatory term used by the British to refer to Chinese temples. The word “Joss” was derived from the Portuguese deos or God, adapted in the pidgin trading language at Chinese ports (Whitworth 463-464). Tai Ping Shan means “peace hill” and was named after the area’s peaceful settlement after the conclusion of an 1810 sea battle between pirates and Qing Dynasty warships. This peace was interrupted when British warships arrived, and the street became a traditional Chinese...
Dates: 1852 August 7

18. Joss house on the Island of Hap-Lee-Chow (Duck’s tongue) opposite Shek-Pai- Wan (Aberdeen). December 31, 1852., 1852 December 31

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Shek-Pai-Wan is a bay between Hong Kong and Aberdeen Island. The British were initially attracted to waterfall at Aberdeen because it was a source of fresh water supply. A short journey from Aberdeen, Hap-Lee-Chow (Ap Lei Chau Island) was an important maritime center. Temples (called “Joss Houses” by the British) were important places of prayer for local fishermen, who would give offerings to ensure plentiful catches (Ingham 142).
Dates: 1852 December 31