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Correspondence

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus
Scope Note: Any forms of addressed and written communication sent and received, including letters, postcards, memorandums, notes, telegrams, or cables.

Found in 82 Collections and/or Records:

James Forbes letter, Ahmed-abad, 1781 May 5, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 11, Page: 219-224
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: The journey to Ahmedabad continues. It begins with a quick passage through several villages, one of which belongs to a group of dancers, “who frequently have lands and villages assigned to them by the Princes of Hindostan.”“Province of Guzerat”Forbes then offers an extended reflection on the province of Gujarat. It is, he regrets, accustomed to groups of robbers, leading to a large amount of uncultivated land and a greater frequency of large towns, which provide for a better...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Ahmed-abad, 1781 May 7, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 11, Page: 231-255
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes’s seventy-sixth letter describes the city and surroundings of the city of Ahmedabad. He begins with the history of the city: it was built in 1426, and Forbes relates a story in which the founder of the city, on a hunting expedition, had liked a particular location and constructed a city on that spot. Now, he says, “lofty minarets, decaying palaces, and ruined aqueducts for miles around, indicate its former extent magnificence.”“Decline of Ahmedabad”Forbes compares...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Angolah, on the Banks of the Sabermatty, 1775 April 27, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 7, Page: 161-165
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes now describes the beginning of the campaign against the Marathas. He narrates the march of the army across a stretch of cultivate lands, full of productive fields ad flush with wildlife. Yet Forbes almost immediately confronts a familiar foe: the heat. He states, “I will not attempt to describe the heat of the day, nor the burning sands that overwhelmed us in the march.” It is beyond his descriptive ability—no European would understand. He does, however, offer examples of its negative...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Anjengo, 1772 February 20, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 5, Page: 209-214
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Letter twenty-eight depicts Forbes’s final arrival at Anjengo (now Anchuthengu). The ship first passes by another Dutch settlement, once prosperous under the Portuguese but now much reduced in size. It then continues along what Forbes describes as a hilly, romantic coastline, before reaching the waters around Anjengo. They land via canoe, as the surf threatens to capsize any larger vessel.Forbes ornaments his description of Anjengo with quotations from Homer and Virgil; the overall...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Anjengo, 1772 November 15, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 6, Page: 65-79
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes’s twenty-ninth letter depicts the surroundings, flora, and fauna of Anjengo (now Anchuthengu). Forbes, however, begins the letter on a rather pessimistic note: the town is “one of those insignificant places that can never offer any new subject for the descriptive pen.” Nonetheless, Forbes provides a mix of descriptions and reflections on his new post and its accompanying creatures.The landscape is, Forbes admits, quite romantic. He describes the winding, mountainous terrain,...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Anjengo, 1773 January 1, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 6, Page: 9-31
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes devotes his thirtieth letter to an account of the Malabars, or the inhabitants of the western coast of India, the Malabar Coast, where Anjengo (now Anchuthengu) is located. He suggests that they are similar to the “northern Hindoos,” but describes them as a nonetheless different group, with slightly difference religious, social, and political practices. His use of the term Malabar—like the term Hindu—seems to encompass geographic, religious, and racial identity in a single...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Baroche, 1775 June 4, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 7, Page: 263-266
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes continues his description of the march through Gujurat with several brief remarks on the countryside, its crops—the best cotton in India—and the arrival of reinforcements to aid the English forces. Much of the letter focuses, however, on a small village, and on Forbes’s own idealized vision of rural life in this region of India. After giving a small overview of one village passed by the army, he writes, “in peaceful times, if any people in India leads happy lives, I think it must be the...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Baroche, 1775 June 5, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 7, Page: 271-276
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes begins his continued description of the military campaign with a note of disappointment: writing about Baroche (now Bharuch), he explains, “this city has not afforded me so much scope for the descriptive as I expected from its size and population.” Nevertheless, he gives a brief description of the city, its economy, and its construction, with particular attention to the sacred sites within the town’s borders. Forbes points out numerous mosques, but observes that most are now in ruins,...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Baroche, 1778 June 1, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 10, Page: 9-23
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes writes his next letter from Baroche (Bharuch), where he hopes “in a few years to obtain that independence, which first brought me to the oriental world.” He begins with an account of his trip to Baroche, before offering an extended description of the city and its surroundings.“Bombay to Surat”Forbes spend little time on his voyage to Surat—it was, in his telling, short and uninteresting. He does, however, comment on the beauty of the ocean, with its “gently-curling...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Baroche, 1783 January 5, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 12, Page: 225-255
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes states his goal for his eightieth letter at the outset: he writes to a friend in Bombay to describe his recent tour through Gujarat, with the express purpose of convincing this friend to come visit Forbes in his more northern outpost. He begins with a remark about the weather—it is, of course, ideal for travelling—and that, while acknowledging the “in general shabby” nature of the city of Baroche (Bharuch), the area nonetheless possesses several nice buildings and some interesting...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bellapoor, on the Banks of the Dahder, 1775 July 20, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 8, Page: 29-33
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Though Forbes continues to spend much of his time in Dhuboy (now possibly Dhuboi), the colonel of the company’s forces lives resides at Ragobah’s (Raghunathrao) camp, near Bellapoor, requiring Forbes spend considerable amounts of time away, living “by no means…that life of repose I had flattered myself with in Dhuboy.” Given this travel between the locations, Forbes spends this letter describing the season, and his own travels. Repeating his characterization of the landscape as an extensive...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bhaderpoor, 1780 October 25, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 11, Page: 65-69
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes writes his next letter from a smaller territory under his control. He gives a few figures about its size, and describes his journey to the town, which required he send people ahead of his party to fix the roads, which had fallen into disrepair. He calls this process a metaphor for the coming of Elijah to prepare the way for the Lord, to create a “high-way for our God!”Having arrived at the town, he turns his attention to the gardens and produce found there. During the rainy...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bheel-poor Camp, 1775 August 6, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 8, Page: 151-153
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes’s next letter takes a less precise approach to the vagaries of Indian and company politics: he claims that “from my present situation, as secretary to the Commander in Chief,” he is not “at liberty to engage on that subject.” He notes only that “Fully-Sihng [possibly Fateh Singh Rao Gaekwad] has made his peace with Ragobah [Raghunathrao]” and has signed a treaty to the company’s advantage. Forbes remembers the honor of meeting with the former, who is now at the camp.Forbes then...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay 1766 March 15, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 1, Page: 299-301
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes’s fifth letter begins with a brief stay at Cochin (Kochi), “a neat fortified town” with “a charming river and pleasant country for recreation.” But despite Cochin’s lovely atmosphere, the ship moves quickly to its next destination. Forbes describes passing Calicut (Kozhikode), “the first port in India ever visited by a European vessel,” and arriving at Tellicherry (Thalassery), a settlement under the rule of the English East India Company. He dwells briefly on the surrounding area—a...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1767 December 1, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 2, Page: 7-21
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes resumes his narrative two years into his stay at Bombay. He begins with a brief overview of the city’s geography: he notes its island location, the widespread cultivation of rice, and the numerous tropical trees that provide a welcome respite from the unyielding sun. He then begins an extensive review of the natural history of the area. This is, however, a natural history, for the moment, guided by his own concerns as a consumer and observer of Indian life: he focuses on various fruits,...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1768 November 25, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 2, Page: 145-161
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Having already described the flora of Bombay and its surrounding area, Forbes introduces this letter as a companion piece, focused instead on the animals he has encounter throughout his several years residence. He begins with a brief overview of edible animals available in Bombay, before quickly moving on to a discussion of those more interesting for their cultural connotations, their strange habits, or their dangerous qualities.Among the semi-domesticated animals, Forbes gives...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1769 December 15, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 3, Page: 113-119
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: From India’s Muslim inhabitants, Forbes moves to the Parsis. They are, he explains, “a race of people, whom the Mahomedan persecutions in Persia drove from their native country, in the eight century of the Christian Era.” Indeed, it is this history that Forbes spends most of his time describing, insisting that “the rites and ceremonies of the modern Parsees bear but little resemblance to the admired doctrines of the Zoroaster and the ancient Magi.” Like the Hindus, the Parsis have, Forbes...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1769 December 23, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 3, Page: 131-135
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes begins this letter with a consideration of the timelessness of Asia and Asian peoples. Having discussed the “general traits” of various peoples, Forbes suggests “such as I have described them, were the Asiatics, at least the inhabitants of Hindostan, some thousand years ago” and such they will remain for the foreseeable future. They are “rivetted to the religion and manners of their forefathers” and, unlike Europeans, show little curiosity of the outside world. The timelessness of...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1769 May 1, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 3, Page: 7-42
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Forbes introduces his eight letter as an overview of Hindu practices and beliefs. He insists that he does not possess the knowledge or space to conduct an in depth investigation of the topic, yet also adds that local particularities need not concern the reader too much, as Hindus are relatively the same regardless of location.A brief historical overview—of the shift from idyllic patriarchy to the despotism of the “rajahs”—almost immediately gives way to an analysis of Hindu religious...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800

James Forbes letter, Bombay, 1769 September 25, copied between 1794 and 1800

 Item — Volume 3, Page: 79-89
Call Number: MSS 66
Scope and Contents: Having completed his description of Hindu practices in India, Forbes turns to the Muslim inhabitants of the subcontinent. This letter is significantly shorter than the previous one, and dwells less on Forbes’s own experiences than his readings of history and theology. He begins with his own account of the arrival of “Islamites, or Mahometans” in India, a process, in his view, marked by violence and destruction. Citing Alexander Dow, Forbes describes the immensity of wealth carried off by the...
Dates: copied between 1794 and 1800