Skip to main content Skip to search Skip to search results

Correspondence

 Subject
Subject Source: Art & Architecture Thesaurus
Scope Note: Any forms of addressed and written communication sent and received, including letters, postcards, memorandums, notes, telegrams, or cables.

Found in 1070 Collections and/or Records:

Edward Burne-Jones letter to John Ruskin, 1862 June

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 2
Call Number: MSS 56
Scope and Contents: Burne-Jones writes that (John William) Inchbold has arrived, bringing Ruskin's letter. Burne-Jones remarks upon his copies made for Ruskin: "four rotten little sketches; one of a head in the Veronese Triumph at the Ducal Palace, one of the Bacchus head of Tintoret (as nearly original size as I could guess), one of St. Catherine, and one of the Harem or Marriage of Cana. They really are so far more faithful than those I did under your...
Dates: 1862 June

Edward Burne-Jones letter to John Ruskin, 1862 June

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 3
Call Number: MSS 56
Scope and Contents: Burne-Jones writes in reply to a letter from Ruskin. He references a "Harry VIII," a nickname for a shared acquaintance who Georgiana Burne-Jones describes as "the boy." Burne-Jones writes that he has had a hard time seeing in the dark to make his copies for Ruskin. He has completed the "sketch of St. Sebastian" and states "today I make a sketch of the St. Catherine" (of Alexandria?). Burne-Jones and Georgiana are "longing" to be with Ruskin in Milan. "William started yesterday for Venice so we...
Dates: 1862 June

Edward Burne-Jones letter to John Ruskin (?), between 1860 and 1890?

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 4
Call Number: MSS 56
Scope and Contents: "Dearest Oldie[?] So disappointed & sorry that[?] my reason against Friday is that I have a sitter that day, and shall be in extreme misery as I am always on these occasions - if Thursday would do as well for you I would […] - or today but if Tuesday is your only day be sure & come. Ever your loving Ned."

If, indeed, addressed to 'Oldie' then this is written to John Ruskin. Ruskin signed his letters 'Oldie' in his correspondence with Burne-Jones.
Dates: between 1860 and 1890?

Edward Burne-Jones letter to John Ruskin, between 1885 and 1889?

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 5
Call Number: MSS 56
Scope and Contents: "Ho blessed one, I have just read the last Praeterita - it has been in the house a week - and it is the first time in my life that this has happened that I haven't instantly read Praeterita, Fors, or new book of thine - and it means that I am very down this winter and sad and flat - and old and tired. But it picked me up brightly, and I wish I had lived with you always - and that we had been monks - Joan &...
Dates: between 1885 and 1889?

Edward Burne-Jones letter to John Ruskin, 1880s?

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 6
Call Number: MSS 56
Scope and Contents: "My Blessed, Do maids dust your pictures - and if so do they treat you as I am treated? Every morning my engravings, pictures, all my treasures hanging on the wall look like this: [Pen-and-ink sketch of pictures hanging off-kilter on the wall]. Every evening I set them straight and look at them longingly like this: [Sketch of Burne-Jones reclining on a sofa with straightened pictures behind him on the wall]. And every morning again: [Sketch of Burne-Jones crouched below his pictures hanging in...
Dates: 1880s?

Edward Lear letter to an unidentified recipient, 1887 March 30

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 10
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes to an unidentified recipient that “I do not know tht I can add anythg more.” He then asks whether there is any chance of him seeing the recipient soon.
Dates: 1887 March 30

Edward Lear letter to Ann Lear, 1849 January 16-February 3

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 1
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes to his sister Ann, from “the desert: outside the walls of Suez.” He begins with a lengthy discussion of camel travel, pleasant as, “you are lifted up on the long necked monster--& away you go just as if on a rocking chair.” And yet they are quite irritable: “when I put the vegetable within a yard of him [Lear’s camel], he yells & grunts as if I were killing him….If you try to make them go faster—they grown: if you stop them or try to go slower—they growl also.” He describes...
Dates: 1849 January 16-February 3

Edward Lear letter to Annie Adams Fields, 1881 May 29

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 8
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes to Fields with condolences for the death of her husband, James Thomas Fields. He mentions that he has recently received several papers describing Fields’s life, and he asks that she convey her thanks to the people who sent them (though he is not sure who that is). Lear closes his letter, writing, “you have the memories of golden hours passed with him who is gone for a time. So that in writing these lines I feel less sad than I might do in many similar cases.”
Dates: 1881 May 29

Edward Lear letter to Edmund Woodthorpe, 1877 August 28

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 5
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear, his plans having fallen through, writes to Edmund Woodthorpe to suggest he come to Woodthorpe’s house “in the wilderness,” and to tell him that he will leave a copy “my last Book of Nonsense” for him at the specified address.
Dates: 1877 August 28

Edward Lear letter to Hallam Tennyson, 1884 September 18

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 9
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes from Villa Tennyson in Sanremo to Hallam Tennyson, at first apologizing for the delay, explaining that the letter traveled quite too far, due to “my frequent change of place owing to ill health, uncomfortable or unsuitable quarters, - quarantines, cordons, & whatnot.” Lear notes that the previous letter included a poem, and “as you tell me to criticize, I must do so.” His criticism of the poem, however, is lighthearted: he first explains that maize does not grow in this part of...
Dates: 1884 September 18

Edward Lear letter to James Fields, 1870 October 8

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 4
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes to James Fields, apologizing for not sending the “Curtis Phila sketch,” and explaining that “Mr. Bush” will ask Fields what the possibilities are for the “Corsica or Xmas book in America.” He closes with a wish to see Fields in Boston.
Dates: 1870 October 8

Edward Lear letter to Miss Cobden, 1881 March 15

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 7
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear remembers a past meeting with Miss Cobden and arranges for a future meeting, saying he will show her some drawings, including possibility “Damascus.” No watermark.
Dates: 1881 March 15

Edward Lear letter to Mr. (?) Dyer, 1878 May 7

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 6
Call Number: MSS 59
Scope and Contents: Lear writes to a Mr. Dyer asking that they leave a frame where he might retrieve it. He remembers Mr. Dyer’s purchase of a drawing and refers him to another—“Morn Broadened on the Borders of the Dark.”
Dates: 1878 May 7

Edward Robinson letter to Margaret Kaye (?), 1936 August 20

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 70
Call Number: MSS 54
Scope and Contents: Robinson's secretary, in a cover letter, apologizes for a letter which "went astray in the post." A copy of that letter is enclosed--in it, Robison regrets he will be back in America at the time of the exhibition.
Dates: 1936 August 20

Eleanor Robertson (secretary to Raymond Mortimer) letter to Evelyn Hunt, 1937 September 17

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 57
Call Number: MSS 54
Scope and Contents: Robertson says that Mortimer is on holiday, but she will bring Hunt's letter to his attention when he returns.
Dates: 1937 September 17

Elizabeth Arnold letter to J. Anthony Denney, 1935 October 24

 Item — Box 1, Folder: 1
Call Number: MSS 54
Scope and Contents: Arnold, secretary to Kenneth Clark, asks about the ceremony time for the "Exhibition which Mr. Kenneth Clark is opening for the Royal College of Art Students' Group on November 16th."
Dates: 1935 October 24

Email to Roger W. Moss, 2002 March 15

 Item — Box 2: Series 6, Folder: 34a
Call Number: MSS 17 , Series VI
Scope and Contents: Shirley Smith discusses his upcoming book launch and exhibition.
Dates: 2002 March 15

Envelope, addressed to "Captain Lawlor, R.A., 13 Marine Parade, Lowesloff ... with Rev. Mr. D.G. Norris's kind regards and best thanks.", between 1847 and 1852?

 Item — 1: Series 1; Series 2; Series 3; Series 4 [39002106196117], Folder: 3a(1)
Call Number: MSS 11, Series II
Scope and Contents: Includes another unsigned and undated note, in a different hand, indicating that the manuscripts originally stored in the envelope (items 3a(2-7) in the present collection) should be saved for future generations.
Dates: between 1847 and 1852?

Envelope to Eva Whyte, circa 1880-1900

 Item — 2: Series 1; Series 2 [39002100397232], Folder: 110
Call Number: MSS 19 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Addressed to Eva Whyte in Seaforth with annotation on front "with Mrs. Pear's [?] love." There are no postal stamps.
Dates: circa 1880-1900