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Hong Kong (China)

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 13 Collections and/or Records:

10. Hong Kong from the beach road, leading to the Happy Valley. December 9, 1852., 1852 December 9

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: This representation illustrates the fashion of British colonial modes of transport by the early 1850s. Chinese figures carry a palanquin, while a horse-drawn carriage also charges by. Happy Valley was the site of a British racecourse and a Protestant Cemetery (see watercolor “11”).
Dates: 1852 December 9

11. Hong Kong. Protestant cemetery in the Happy Valley. October 26, 1852., 1852 October 26

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: The Hong Kong Cemetery (also known as the Protestant Cemetery and the Colonial Cemetery) was opposite the oldest racecourse in Hong Kong in Happy Valley, and in the middle of a line of cemeteries that included the Roman Catholic cemetery (founded 1848) and later Islamic cemetery (1870). In 1853 (a year after this view), the captain and crew of the HMS Cleopatra erected a monument to Scottish trader and explorer Robert Burns, grandson of the poet, who was killed by pirates of the Tunku River...
Dates: 1852 October 26

12. Hong Kong. Chinese man of war junk mounting 27 Guns. Mandarin’s Flag (Blue button at the Fore). July 26, 1851., 1851 July 26

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Since the Song Dynasty, ocean-going junks of this size made trips to Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean.
Dates: 1851 July 26

14. Hong Kong. HMS Cleopatra lying off Jardine’s establishment. November 22, 1852., 1852 November 22

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Jardine & Matheson Co. were the most powerful opium merchants in Hong Kong. They founded their company in 1832, grew rapidly by exporting tea and silk to England, and by smuggling opium. They purchased land in the Causeway area when Britain acquired Hong Kong after the Treaty of Nanking, at the conclusion of the first opium war. Porcher’s journal describes the “patent slip” at Jardine’s Establishment, where “ships of about 500 tons… can be hauled up” and repaired (6). A drawing of the...
Dates: 1852 November 22

17. Joss house built in Tai-Pin-Shan in 1851. August 7, 1852., 1852 August 7

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: “Joss House” was the derogatory term used by the British to refer to Chinese temples. The word “Joss” was derived from the Portuguese deos or God, adapted in the pidgin trading language at Chinese ports (Whitworth 463-464). Tai Ping Shan means “peace hill” and was named after the area’s peaceful settlement after the conclusion of an 1810 sea battle between pirates and Qing Dynasty warships. This peace was interrupted when British warships arrived, and the street became a traditional Chinese...
Dates: 1852 August 7

19. Hong Kong. Village and barracks at Check-Chow (Stanley) on the S.W. side of the island. December 31, 1852., 1852 December 31

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: In his diary, Porcher describes the British barracks built on the ‘Checkchu’ (or ‘Check-chow’) peninsula (called Stanley) and at Siwan: “[A]fter a certain time, all the English troops were obliged to be called in in consequence of both places turning out so unhealthy, on account of the malaria rising from the valleys, over which both stations had been built, at present 12 and 15 men of the Ceylon Rifles under the command of Native Officers, having been left there” (Diary 3).
Dates: 1852 December 31

7. China. Hong Kong from the Capsingmoon Passage. July 30, 1852., 1852 July 30

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: “HONG KONG” is inscribed in the lower left corner.
Dates: 1852 July 30

8. Hong Kong from Lyemoon Passage. September 8, 1852., 1852 September 1852

 Item — Oversize 1: Series 1; Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series I
Scope and Contents: Visible in the distance is Victoria Peak, which dominated early views of the city. Settlement soon began to encroach higher as the city expanded, with the most prestigious Western-style settlements on the peak.
Dates: 1852 September 1852

Diary, 1851 September – 1853 January

 Item — Vol. 1: Series 2
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series II
Scope and Contents: Holograph diary, labelled: “E.A. Porcher. Notes on Ports Visited in H.M.S. CLEOPATRA, September 1851 – circa 1853”. Includes the following small pen and ink drawings: “purchase for hauling vessels up at Jardine’s slip” (page 7), chart (18), map of Labuan (20), diagram (25), 2 sketches (26), sketch of a lighthouse (45) and a map of Amoy (55).Porcher provides general descriptions of the ports visited by the Cleopatra, including hydrographical information, natural resources, natural...
Dates: 1851 September – 1853 January

Letter to Madelina Porcher, 1849 December 29

 Item — Vol. 2, no. 6: Series 3
Call Number: MSS 38 , Series III
Scope and Contents: Headed: "HMS Cleopatra, Hong Kong."A letter from Porcher to his sister, Madelina, in London. He expresses concern about the cholera epidemic in Europe. He also describes a trip to Canton with some fellow officers, which he obtained leave to conduct. He relates an outsider’s view of the city around the ‘factories’ area, where foreigners were permitted to stay. He also describes Whampoa, the location where foreign boats docked: “This is a very stupid place… As the town is built on...
Dates: 1849 December 29

Yale-China Association records

 Collection
Call Number: RU 232
Overview: The records document the activities of the Yale-China Association in mainland China (1901-1951), Hong Kong (1951-present), and the United States (1901-present). They consist of administrative and policy files produced by the home office in New Haven, correspondence and memoranda written by staff members while serving in China, and administrative files and correspondence produced by the New Asia office in Hong Kong.
Dates: 1878-2008